Fence Post

wrote:

Yes, and the explosion can be explained too. All radios made during the last 31 years come with a small M/AM device inside. On receipt of the proper signal, the force field is dropped. This is a part of the 1974 US terrorism act.
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Hi Tom,
I've never tried this, but read that you can remove old tree stumps by burning them out with diesel.
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I have used the following method successfully several times: Some of the devices mentioned are home-built.
1. Purchase 3-4 lag screws - 1/2" diameter, 12" long These will be screwed into the remaining post stub in the ground. An impact wrench (I use an electric model) will quickly install the screws. In a 4x4 post, 2 screws are about all that there is room for. 2. Rent/borrow/buy a pair of farm jacks. These are mechanical jacks that provide about 48" of lift. They are used in tandem and must be jacked up at the same rate. 3. Here's the home-built: A piece of 4"x4" square tubing, heavy wall, about 12" long. In the middle of the tubing, cut a window 6" long on one side. Once that window is cut, drill 2 holes 1/2" diameter on the opposite side. The holes must be about 2" apart. Each lag screw goes through a washer, then through the window and out the hole on the opposite side to screw into the broken post. The farm jacks are limited as to how low to the ground they can be used. They must be about 6-8" raised in order for the pump arm to cycle. In order to permit the jacks to lift the device, each end of the square tubing needs a loop extending upward on the same side as the window in the tube. I suppose that some chain could be used for the loop. My solution was to cut two lengths of #6 rebar, each about 24" long and bend them unto a U-shape. The legs of the U are about 4" apart. Each U-piece was then welded to the extreme end of the square tubing to form a handle. This whole apparatus works well when the residual post is not too rotten and there is a nominal amount of concrete on the post. Rotten posts will not hold the screws, resulting in pullout. Too much concrete and you will not be able to pump the jacks. The jacks are only rated at 7000 pounds, so if you cannot pump down, do not use a vehicle or more force...it will just damage the jack. If this approach does not work, go rent the 65# electric jackhammer and bust up a bit of driveway. Cost you about $50 for 4 hours.
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Presumably, the owners will not allow outdoor awnings either. Or indoor shutters. So, as a renter your best option is in draperies lined with a light color, kept drawn.
Banty
--


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crmay Wrote:

Many thanks for all your useful ideas, I shall be busy this weekend drilling and setting fire to things then!
Regards
Tom
--
Tom Holloway

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I have used this very successfully in the past with posts that are NOT set in concrete . Get a "T" shaped wine cork puller. Twist the puller into the stump of the old post. move back/forth and left/right to loosen it a bit and then use steady upward pulling to remove the old broken post.
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Assuming that the submerged post base can be removed, what kind of post will replace it? Maybe a galvanized metal post with a bit of mortar or concrete to hold it?
Is this a corner post or gate post with additional loads on it or is it just a line post that must resist wind forces against the fence panels?
How about using an eye-bolt with 12" length and gluing it into one of those holes you have drilled? Wait a day and pull it out. A 20' log chain wrapped over a car rim and attached to a trailer hitch would provide substantial vertical force.
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I have done this a few times when I wanted to reuse a concrete footing. What I found worked best was to get a 3" saw tooth bit (e.g. 06J01.48 from leevalley.com) and drill out the core of the post. The 3" bit allows you to stay within the post if you start slightly off center or end up slightly off plumb; you don't want to hit the concrete as that will quickly dull the bit. Getting the bit started is the most difficult part, since the broken end of the post is probably not flat.
Once you've drilled out the core of the post, use a long pry bar with a flat chisel end to split the remainder of the post at the 4 places it is thinnest. Then you can remove each of the remaining quarters by prying it into the 3" hole and then pulling it out.
Cheers, Wayne
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Wayne, Thanks for the idea. I already have a 2-9/16 self-feeding bit such as plumbers use to cut holes in framing for gas and water lines. Already have the Hole-Hawg drill to power it too. Just need an extension since these bits don't have a very long shank to them. Now if that big drill doesn't slap me silly the first time the bit hangs up, have that hole drilled in no time at all.
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IBM5081 wrote:

Just one little "cautionary" note: I, too, had a Hole-Hawg pistol grip with right angle attachment. I, too, used the self feeding bit to drill 3-1/4" holes for plumbing runs in my basement. After a LONG day of drilling, cutting and gluing, I was about finished. However, I was also darned tired. When I drilled a hole and pulled the bit out, the drill was still coasting down. Holding it by the pistol grip, I let it swing down alongside my right leg, as I had done a few hundred times that day. This time, however, the augur point hit me squarely on the right knee and did just, precisely, what Mr. Greenlee intended when he made the bit. It dug in and kept digging, dragging the cutter along with it.
It went in full depth and the cutter also did a pretty decent job on my leg.
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Yes, I have already read the diverse manners in which a Hole-Hawg, no clutch available, will continue to turn without regard to body parts that might get in the way. That sounds like a nasty injury.

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