Fence facing etiquette

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Many fences in nearby back yards are shared fences. At least the side fences are. This new back door neighbor is doing a gut renovation of his rowhouse. At least a million dollar renovation. He is putting up all the fences himself, so that he can have a consistent look around his property. I'm happy to not have to share the cost, and happy to get the extra couple of inches of having it all on his property.
Plus the side lines don't line up. His back line abuts two neighbors. So he would have four neighbors to convince to share.
I went out of my way to hire the same surveyor that he hired. This gets me his survey on my survey. Though after his survey he added an extension which isn't shown. See:
http://donwiss.com/housemanual/492-1st-St-Stakeout-Survey.jpg
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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The old fence was chain link. Two of the four have wood fences on their property blocking the chain link. I had a stockade fence leaning on it.

But is he going to get all four to agree to his design? So that he can achieve his desired consistency? Plus his fence is a rather expensive cedar one. See:
http://donwiss.com/pictures/misc/535-2nd-Side-Fence.jpg
This is a shared fence that several neighbors have put up:
http://donwiss.com/pictures/misc/Alternating-Picket-Fence.jpg
Note dramatic cost difference. I noted earlier that this new back yard neighbor is spending over $1 million on his renovation. This is on top of paying $2.4 million to buy the house. I doubt that saving a few dollars is a big concern.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Seems like Park Slope gentrification and (perhaps) housing bubble. Sometimes I don't like the architectural restrictions we have around here, but sometimes I do like them. Keeps most people from doing horrible things to their properties.
--
Best regards
Han
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SMS wrote:

Ah, one of the exceptions I discussed earlier. Ordinarily, when the neighbor starts putting up an expensive fence - say one made out of marble blocks topped with gargoyles, you SIL is obligated to voice her objection else she would assent by silence to the grandiose plan.
Here, since the neighbor said he'd foot the bill for the whole thing, including battlements and watchtowers, she should be completely off the hook. In the worst case, she'd be liable for half the cost of a fence normally found in the neighborhood. Plus court costs, lawyer fees, and various notary charges.
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On the topic of grandiose fences. There is a trend in some neighborhoods around here to make fences and window bars out of stainless steel instead of wrought iron. And then leave it unpainted. Ostentatious.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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My gate hinges and strikers are unpainted stainless (at least all the ones I installed). Is that ostentatious?
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On 10/23/12 10:18 AM, Don Wiss wrote:

Some have replied that living where there are fence zoning rules must suck. I don't mind the zoning rules, but for me, it sure would suck to live where I would need window bars.
I moved away from such a place over 30 years ago and never regretted it.
Don: I lived in a row house in Queens.
As a matter of fact, if I Street View the house I grew up in I can see the bars on the first floor windows. Rotate the Street View around and I can see the new view from my old living room window. The woods I played in have been replaced with a public school. The street is narrow enough to see right into the windows.
The view from my current (un-barred) living room window is of woods that will never be developed - town owned property consisting of a extremely steep hill overlooking a bay.
Zoning laws I can live with. Window bars (or more precisely, the reason for needing them)...not so much.
To each his own.
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wrote

We've lived here now for 14 years (how time flies) <http://radburn.org . Our home is just to the left outside the picture on that home page. As shown there, we have "park" at the rear of my property, where we removed the ugly chain link fence. On one side we have 2 neighboring properties, on the other one. The one neighbor has a fence on the property line, which is theirs and which they maintain. On the other side, one of the neighbors owns a path between my and the second neighbor's property, and my fence there is 1 foot inside my property, away from that path. When the second neighbor (who lived there before us) started to plant bushes and other plants on the 1 foot strip between the path and my fence, we made clear that that was on our property, but that it was OK as long as the bushes were trimmed, and that we reserved the right to trim them as we pleased. The bushes provide some figment of privacy. We all are friendly, respectful of each other, and helpful to each other - which is nice in this physically close neighborhood.
--
Best regards
Han
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Why not build a fence that looks good from both sides?
I only have one small fence, and live out in the country where none of the neighbors can see it anyway. Since I can see both sides of the fence, I built it so it looks the same from either side.
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com
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