Fence facing etiquette

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On Oct 19, 1:16pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

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Not really. My backyard is offset from the 2 yards behind me, approximately 2/3, 1/3. The 1/3 neighbor had some nice board-on-board fencing, the 2/3 neighbor had chain link.
I bought the same style board-on-board fence and installed it face to face with the chain link fence to hide it, to match the other 1/3 and to provide more privacy.
Point being, two fences, face to face, isn't silly if there's a valid reason.

Now that, I agree with.
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wrote:

Good grief. There is no "good side" of chain link fencing.

Different subject.

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Of course there is. By code the posts must go inside the yard. That makes one side "good" and the other side not.
You could say that there is no good side of board-on-board fence, but for the same reason, there is. The posts must go on the owner's side.

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wrote:

No, neither are "good". They're all uglier than sin and banned in my neighborhoods. Come to think of it, they've been banned every place I've lived.

Utter nonsense. One side has visible horizontal supports as well as posts, neither of which can be seen from the "good" side. <...>
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Ugly or not, allowed or not, for the purposes of this discussion, the good side has no poles.
Chain link fence is still used around schools, ball fields, etc. Poles are always installed on the interior, which is what this thread is about.

Utter what? Your conception of board-on-board fence must be different than everybody else's.
http://www.butlerfence.com/images/products/Board.jpg
http://www.gmfence.com/board.html
http://www.alleghenyfence.com/images/wres5B.jpg
Perhaps you are thinking of solid board or solid board-on-board fencing?
http://whitmorefence.com/ALBUM_Privacy/IMG_0620.jpg
Just as aside, the posts in the solid board picture above might actually be seen from the good side, but I don't think anyone would complain. It might even look nicer than just one long solid fence on the "good side"
One last note...
I forgot that there is a way to install board-on-board with 2 good sides. If you double up the number of horizontal supports, you can sandwich the posts between the interior and exterior panels. The horizontals and posts would be visible from both sides but it is an approved method in my town. Typically you need to overlap the vertical boards more since they are farther apart and therefore more open when viewed at an angle. In that manner you can have two good sides without doubling the cost of the fence, but it is still more expensive than the one good side method.
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That can be done with some style of fences, but certainly not all.
How do you make a stockade fence or a chain link fence or a board-on- board fence pretty on both sides without doubling up the fence so that the posts are sandwiched in between? That would basically double the cost of the fencing - minus the posts.
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wrote:

Alternate pickets.
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On Oct 19, 1:35pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Alternate pickets on a chain link or stockade fence?
As I said, pretty on both sides can be accomplished fairly easily with some fence styles, but not with all.
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wrote:

Chain link has no good side. Stockade, why not?

You can come close. A close-picket fence can be mixed pretty transparently with a alternating pickets. A neighbor on one side replaced the fence (it was probably "mine" but did it before I moved in) with alternating pickets. It doesn't look that bad.
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Yes. Like this one:
http://donwiss.com/pictures/misc/Alternating-Picket-Fence.jpg
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Yeah. Sorta like that, though it looks like that one has a rail on the top rather than pickets.

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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Not only, but an alternating-picket fence is much less likely to get blown down in a hurricane (much of the wind can actually go THROUGH the fence).
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You are correct. It's really a good fence, though I'd probably spend a little more and move the pickets a little closer than 50%; more privacy.
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It appears that is what he is doing with the sides. I can only see the inside of the sides. See:
http://donwiss.com/pictures/misc/535-2nd-Side-Fence.jpg
To those discussing access, the men have already trampled my garden. And even if the post is fully on his side of the property line, the concrete will spill onto my side. But I'm not gong to complain about these.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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donwiss@no_spam.com says...

Yes, same as when wearing shirts or pants, good looking side out where people see it.
Underwear does not matter!
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I like the analogy. Thanks for the chuckle.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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You haven't watched too many kids, these days.

Outside, man, outside!
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Don Wiss wrote:

Don't know the answer to either of your questions, but I will share something that will cause you to drop your donuts.
Assume you have a naughty neighbor - unsightly yard, dog on the loose, droopy-boobed, over-weight, common-law wife that sunbathes in the nude, whatever, and, as a result of this continued affront to the sensibilities of you, your family, and all right-thinking people, you decide to erect a fence.
After the sturdy, opaque fence is in place, here's how you twist the knife: You present your neighbor with a bill for half the cost!
And he must (eventually) pay.
What! Am I nuts!
Nope. Follow along.
A contract is a meeting of the minds. When you began constructing the fence, the neighbor agreed to its construction by not objecting. In law, this is called "Assent by Silence," and a contract latches in place. When the fence is completed, he is liable for half its value under the rubric of "unjust enrichment." That is, he is benefiting from a project to which he agreed in advance.
There are deviations from this basic rule: You build a fence out of marble and your neighbor had in mind something less grand or you build the fence before the neighbor was made aware of your intentions (he was out of town, etc.), but, in the main, the foregoing evaluation is bullet-proof and your small claims court will back you up.
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This must be locality-dependent. Around here (NJ), a fence must face good side out, and be 1 foot or more inside the property line. Of course, if 2 property owners agree to put up a single fence right on the property line, you most likely can do that, but I am not sure what happens when one of the properties changes hands.
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Best regards
Han
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When I lived in Philly, fences were on the property line and cost was often shared. Ownership was transferred with property. Many row houses had fences in the back yard on the line if shared, inches inside if not. Since some houses were only 16' wide, it was not practical to put them a foot inside.
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