Fence facing etiquette

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On 10/22/2012 12:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

You might be wrong there....HOA and condo assns' bylaws have the standing of law in Florida, after state, county, city, etc., and as long as they don't conflict with the higher statutes.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It must suck to live in a city with zoning.
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As hard as it may be to believe, there are actually folks out there that don't want a junk yard or fat rendering plant going in the lot next to their house.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Then deal with the fat rendering place directly.
We had a situation similar some years ago. On the ritziest street in the ritziest part of town, Shell Oil bought a corner lot and announced plans to build a gas station.
The neighbors objected. They cut up their credit cards and mailed the pieces to Shell. The residents vowed all-out war!
Shell decided they didn't want to piss-off John Connally or the sitting Secretary of Commerce (Robert Mossbacher). The company donated the lot to the city for a pocket-park.
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wrote:

Not nearly as bad as living where there is NO zoning and someone decides to build a biker bar on one side of you and a 24 hour truck repair shop on the other.
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On 10/19/2012 6:12 AM, Don Wiss wrote:

I saw it in building code (Florida or doing a Google?) as you state. Just bought a house with fences situated that way, about 3" inside property line according to survey. I've never given it much thought, but looking at a home from off the property it might look rather odd to see the back side of fence.
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Amazing that code forces your neighbor to provide 'access' in order to properly put in that fence. Else the neighbor gets the 'ugly' side.
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On 10/19/2012 9:57 AM, Robert Macy wrote:

Give access? Don't know what you mean. Same principle I believe as not being able to remove all branches of trees at the property line....intentionally spiteful giving of the ugly treatment to neighbors :o)
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I'll give that a try....
My local code allows me to put a fence right along the property line, but the good side must face the adjoining property. When I sunk the posts for my wooden sections, they were within a few inches of the property line, with just enough room for the sections to be attached to the neighbor's side of the posts, but not cross over the line.
In order to screw the panels to the posts, I had to be on the neighbor's property. Even if I suspended myself from the tops of the sections to screw them on, I'd still be in the neighbor's air space.
Thus, "access" to the neighbor's property is (most likely) required.
I suppose, with enough manpower and extremely good planning, you could install the entire fence post-side-down on your property and then stand it up and drop it down into the post holes, but backing filling the post holes would be pretty difficult with the fence blocking the neighbor's side of the posts. That's not a method I would like to be involved with.
In my case, after putting up the fence, I used spare slats to cover the butt joints where the sections were screwed to the posts. I don't know if that was required, but I sure would want someone to do that for me.
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I did some searching. No mention of such in NYC according to:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/dob/downloads/pdf/tool_kit_fences.pdf
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Don Wiss wrote the following on 10/19/2012 6:12 AM (ET):

Yes, in some places. Maybe most places. Besides, putting the ugly side of the fence to the outside may provide easier access to your property by neer-do-wells using the horizontals as a foothold.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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Some places. Not all, obviously. Check with your code enforcement agency, if any.

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This is more of curiosity. I live in rowhouse Brooklyn. No one on the street can see what fence once puts up in their backyards. The prior owners of my house put up a stockade fence on one side. They faced the good side to the neighbor. The Brit now living behind me is now putting up a fence. He is facing the back to me. He was planning to have the posts 2 3/4" onto my property. As only the posts would be on my property, he thought it would be okay. I told the contractor to move them. (Only the posts are now up.)
The reason he was trying to pull this off is he has a telephone pole at the edge of his property and he wanted to get the fence behind it. To keep all of the fence on his property he is now going to have to stop the fence at the pole. And then resume it on the other side.
The prior chain link fence had bent around the pole putting the pole on my side. My a/c condenser is close to the property line. If he has the posts partially on my property the fence will be within a couple inches and the condenser's efficiency will be decreased. I still may move it in a bit.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Is there some particular reason you said "The Brit now living behind me..."?
What does his nationality have to do with putting up a fence?
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wrote:

Maybe harry moved behind him. Sounds like him, anyway.
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If you go back to my original post I asked if fence facing etiquette was different in the UK. It may be.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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True dat!
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"Don Wiss" wrote in message
When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My questions:
(1) Is this a law in places? (2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is what I would do. WW
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wrote:

Putting the pretty side to the neighour's side requires working access on the neighbour's side. And if the neighbour also puts up a fence, pretty side to pretty side, everyone has an ugly fence., and the second fence is going to be a real hassle to build in place.
Some pretty petty laws, as far as I'm concerned.
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 12:34:29 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Two fences, face to face, is kinda silly, no?

No, it's really just common sense.
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