favorite non-contact voltage detector?

Replaced the batteries in my Amprobe one that I've had for a year or so with Eneloops; it got very warm and now doesn't work even with the old alkalines back in it. I'm not impressed as I received this as a gift and actually had to exchange the first one because the battery cover wouldn't stay on. 2nd one was OK until this AM though. I actually have grown to like having it although my initial thought was "why do I need this when I have several different multimeters?" (answer - NCVD is faster for many jobs.)
What do you guy like? Fluke? Other? Bonus points if you've used it with Eneloops or other NiMH rechargeables and can verify that it won't blow up. (this is only the second device that I've come across that wouldn't work with NiMH - first being a Nikon digital camera that was specifically advertised as being NiMH friendly.) the Amprobe lights up, buzzes, and shakes which is nice - really would like to keep all three features.
nate
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On 9/30/2013 8:47 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

I had a black and yellow one from Walmart, that did fine for a while. Stopped working, and no idea why. My next one came from Horrid Fright Tools. Seems to work OK, but no beep or vibrate. Not sure about nicads.
Agree, the voltage detector sure can be handy in so many situations. I use mine, troubleshooting plug in devices.
Amprobe costs more than Horrid Fright, but might be worth the extra one time purchase cost.
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The company I worked for supplied us with Fluke testers. You have to be careful that you get the one with the range you want. One is good for voltages from around 20 to 90 volts, another from 90 to 1000 and the third from 200 to 1000. They seem to hold up and work ok. Lights up and sounds a tone when voltage is detected.
We probably had over 20 of them in use and they seemed to work fine. Good thing about them is they are CAT IV rated.
They are useful for some things, but before I stick my hands in anything, I use another meter just to be sure.
Used them from 120 volt circuits up to some 480 volt 3 phase circuits.
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Ment to put in the url .
http://www.fluke.com/fluke/usen/electrical-test-tools/electrical-testers/fluke-1ac-ii.htm?PIDV048
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On 09/30/2013 10:46 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Awesome... posted my question over in the battery section of CPF as well, the one response that I got said that Flukes play nice with NiMH (both my Fluke DMMs do...) I'm on my way out the door to the supply house, looks like the 1AC-II is the way to go. I'll miss the shaker of the Amprobe, but having tools I can rely on is a Good Thing.
thanks again
nate
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I don't know for sure. All ours have the flat tip. That will fit in a standard US wall socket.
Just looking at the pictures , some of them have tips that are round instead of flat. Not sure if they will fit a wall socket or not.
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The Fluke testers are fully insulated round and flat.
I do have a Fluke meter that has some test leads that have very sharp points that can punch through most insulation if needed. Also have some that have rounded tips and those will fit into some alligator clips.
I guess that my favorite test leads are the ones that you can remove the tips and put on differant kinds. I usually use just the pointed kind, but also like the ones that are sort of like alligator clips. They have 'ears' about half way from the end and you activate the opening of the clip by pulling the ears back. Almost as if giving someone a shot with a needle. Keeps the hands out of the wiring beter when working on live circuits. http://www.fluke.com/fluke/usen/accessories/Test-Leads-Probes-and-Clips/AC220.htm?PIDU683
I never did like the hooking the rubber coated alligator clips to a live circuit.
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I have a Klein NCVT-2. I can't compare it to any other brand since it's the only one I've used. It does what I need it to do, so I'm happy with it.
It doesn't buzz, so if that's important then this device is not for you. Personally, I'm not sure I want a tester that buzzes and vibrates when I get near a hot wire. Buzzing and vibrating are things I like to avoid when working near electricity. ;-)
There's no mention of it being - or not being - NiMH friendly. CAT IV, auto sensing dual range 12-48 VAC and 48-1000 VAC or single range mode, 48-1000 VAC.
There's contact information, a product video and brochures available at this link.
http://www.kleintools.com/catalog/electrical-testers/dual-range-non-contact-voltage-tester-ncvt-2
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The Klein NCVT that I have lights up and beeps. Different colors and different beeps for the 2 ranges. The ranges are listed as 12-48 VAC and 48-1000 VAC.
I wonder what is does at exactly 48 VAC...
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