Fastenal Ribbed Nutsert

Anybody ever use one of these?
http://www.fastenal.com/web/products/detail.ex?sku=0125617
I was thinking of using these to fix the screen on my woodstove. The screen itself is about 16" by 21" by 0.75" sheet metal tray with hundreds of little holes in the surface to allow a view of the fire while retaining sparks. It has a segment of metal welded into each side of the perforated face, with a 1/4-20 threaded hole in each; a threaded rod assembly goes through and is turned to engage a catch that holds the screen on.
The catches have been jamming lately and examination reveals that the threads in the welded inserts are worn, while the shafts are OK. From this, I assume that the inserts were a softer steel than the shafts. This is an old stove and they don't make replacement parts anymore, so I was thinking of drilling out the holes and tapping in the nutserts. I'd thread a bolt into the nutsert before tapping to prevent distorting the threads.
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

These inserts will work just fine. Installation requires a tool.
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Apparently an expensive tool! I wonder if the nutset could collapsed and set by tightening a nut/washer on a on bolt threaded through the back end of the rivet?
wrote:

These inserts will work just fine. Installation requires a tool.
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd try a grade 8 bolt, then a couple washers and a grade 8 nut. Hold the bolt head, and then tighten the grade 8 nut. Might not work, test on some other item first.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Apparently an expensive tool! I wonder if the nutset could collapsed and set by tightening a nut/washer on a on bolt threaded through the back end of the rivet?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, November 24, 2012 6:53:18 PM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

My idea was to drill out the hole, heat the insert red hot with a propane torch, quickly place the hole over a socket and hammer the thing into place.
Paul

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Your wood stove will also get hot so may be expanding and contracting daily, weaking any simple friction fit. Pinching this rivet-like fitting [that seems to be the proper application] might yield longer-term stability.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Paul<<<<<
If you are serious about such a substantial departure from "normal" installation, I would suggest doing so on a disposable test piece. These "inserts" are designed to be symmetrically pulled / compressed into place....not heated and hammered.
On a scale of 1 to 10, your proposed method is about a 2.
Get the proper tool.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Could work. I'd try a couple of samples, not on your fireplace grate. Till you get the feel of how they behave.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My idea was to drill out the hole, heat the insert red hot with a propane torch, quickly place the hole over a socket and hammer the thing into place.
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/24/2012 8:38 PM, Pavel314 wrote:

Heating the insert makes it expand and fit worse.
I would try a bolt, as above, to pull the insert in. Or hammering it in cold. Heating the screen and cooling the insert? Looks like really small ribs on the insert.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, November 25, 2012 10:38:19 AM UTC-5, bud-- wrote:

Poor wording on my part; by "insert" I was referring to the metal plate with the threaded hole which was inserted into the spark screen, not the rivet itself. I'm going to take Stormin's advice and tighten it in with a bolt. I stopped at our local Fastenal today but that part wasn't in stock, so they ordered a few.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Please do three or four, on a separate metal. To get the feel for the operation, without risking damage to your real work. And, please, let us know how it works out. Could be a totally useful process for us to learn.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Poor wording on my part; by "insert" I was referring to the metal plate with the threaded hole which was inserted into the spark screen, not the rivet itself. I'm going to take Stormin's advice and tighten it in with a bolt. I stopped at our local Fastenal today but that part wasn't in stock, so they ordered a few.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Harbor Freight has nut inserts, aluminum.
The web page you linked, steel only, should do the job for you. The install tool is a little like a pop rivet tool.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
These inserts will work just fine. Installation requires a tool.
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/24/2012 2:38 PM, Pavel314 wrote:

Here's the set I own, manufactured by Marson and carried by many suppliers. I have purchased two of them over the years from NAPA.
http://www.fastenal.com/web/products/detail.ex?sku26104
A similar looking tool is sold by Harbor Freight at a much lower price and will become one of your most useful tools if you decide to buy one of them. ^_^
http://www.harborfreight.com/45-piece-threaded-insert-riveter-kit-1210.html
http://tinyurl.com/cz9nket
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Use the HF tool, with the other company's inserts?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

A similar looking tool is sold by Harbor Freight at a much lower price and will become one of your most useful tools if you decide to buy one of them. ^_^
http://www.harborfreight.com/45-piece-threaded-insert-riveter-kit-1210.html
http://tinyurl.com/cz9nket
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/25/2012 6:29 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

As long as the tool's threaded mandrel matches the threads in the riv-nut, it will install it. The Harbor Freight tool while inexpensive has steel handles and should be able to install both aluminum and steel riv-nuts. My Marson tool is a much higher quality but for someone who is going to use riv-nuts around the home and light commercial use, the Harbor Freight tool is fine. If you don't have one, pick one up and you will soon discover how useful the riv-nuts are and you will trip over applications for them that will surprise you. It will become a favorite tool. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Paul:
"Nutsert" is just Fastenal's name for this kind of fastener. If you go to Google Images, and type in "insert nut", you'll see all kinds of variations on the same theme.
I use "flanged insert nuts" like these"
[image:
http://www.leevalley.com/en/images/item/hardware/jigfixtureparts/00n1013s1.jpg ]
to install prefab counter tops onto the existing plywood square edge counter tops in my building, and they seem to work fine. Mine are made of aluminum and have a Allen key drive at the flanged end, 1/4" X 20tpi machine threads on the ID and "external threads" (kinda) on the OD so that they can be driven into a predrilled hole in particle board. I use 4 flanged insert nuts per counter top and have two counter tops in each suite for a total of 160 flanged insert nuts. I haven't had any problems with any of them so far.
You should also be aware that you can buy "perforated metal" in stainless steel, brass and aluminum to make a new screen if you want:
[image:
http://rolling-mills-steel.rolledsteels.com/images/perforated-steel-1.jpg ]
Just phone up any of the places listed under "Sheet Metal" in your yellow pages phone directory and ask who sells perforated metal in your area.
--
nestork


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.