Fan control reversed

I have a problem with a variable fan control being reversed. Off is off... but that's the only thing that's normal. The low setting results with the fan at max speed and the high setting causes the fan to run at it's lowest speed. I've tried three different fan controls.
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So isn't that good enough?

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With some the first "On" speed is high and then medium, then low. Is there a label indicating the speeds or are you just presuming that low should be first?
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I've tried one that is labeled 0, 1, 2, 3, 4.
0 = off 1 = high 2 = slower 3 = slower still 4 = slowest
I also tried a rotary type where as I rotate it clockwise out of the off position, it goes to high speed. As I continue to rotate it further, the fan runs slower.
This runs contrary to every variable speed adjustment I've every seen for fans. I'm worried that there may me another issue (bad wiring, fan problem, etc.).
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Duck wrote:

This is exactly how it should be for a fan. It is easier on the motor to start in high then be turned down lower if desired. Also most people when they reach for the fan they are warm and want to move a lot of air as soon as possible.
Rich
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That's the way ceiling fans are made. I've never seen one that didn't work this way. The pull chain on the fan body uses the same pattern. I don't know why. It's always bothered me too.
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I believe because the motor may not have enough torque on the lowest speed setting to start the fan if you just switch it directly to the lowest speed, but briefly passing through high speed will get the blades spinning so the motor doesn't burn out.
nate
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alt.home.repair:

That would surprise me. You can leave the fan set on Low, then turn it on and off with the wall switch. I've done this with every fan I've ever owned, and none of them have had a problem. Low is the right speed for me most of the time.
I used to sell ceiling fans, and I was never trained to tell customers to start them on high. Of course, that's no proof.
I can't tell you how many fans I've installed over the years (billions and billions?), and I've never had a call-back because a fan burned out. I HAVE, however, seen some that have worn out from old age and constant use.
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Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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You may be confusing this with hamburgers eaten.

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Most I've seen would do that. Maybe some motors won't start in low.
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Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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