Fail-safe for keyless entry

Page 2 of 4  


Leave the electronics as is, and modify the fob to add some height around the holes the buttons with some epoxy. That way accidental pressing of the buttons will be difficult.
This also has the advantage of being cheap, and if the electronics ever go on the fritz, you can just pop the new guts into the old case and your good to go.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I should have said epoxy putty. It comes in a ribbon with two colors and you slice off a chunk and knead the stuff together untill the color is even.
The method I would suggest is to remove the board and the buttons from the case and then rough up the front of the case with 100 grit sand paper.
Shape the epoxy putty into little rings and shape those around the holes in the case that the buttons fit through.
Once the epoxy putty is set, any ooze over can be filed away and the surface can be sanded smooth.
Paint to match or leave ugly.
Hope that helps.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not an option. This is a handicapped van, and the keyfob in needed to activate the whole ramp deployment, kneeling and electric door activity.
Thanks anyway,
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't put the fob in your pocket or purse until you are out of range.
Cost: $0.00
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mike wrote:

Still wind up with a dead battery...... May also set off a terrorist bomb.
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Please explain.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Green wrote:

If you are out of range and are still keeping the remote buttons pressed, it will run down the battery in the remote. The terrorist crack is referring to the fact that you could activate something unintentionally. The insurgents in Iraq use all sorts of remote technology to set off IED's. It was levity.
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ask DerbyDad03 - I am humor challenged. He has to explain all his jokes to me, too.
Oh well.
I get your point, though. It's just not an optimum solution for me.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Green wrote:

I've a friend who would often bring me his huge remote key fob for his Dodge pickup for repair. I would solder the battery contacts back on to the little circuit board until the board board started coming apart. He said the darn things were very expensive.
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We tried that method. You'd be surprised at all the things that end up in your hands as you exit a vehicle. At least twice the fob activated just from being clutched along with a bag and the GPS. The damn thing's too twitchy and needs to be untwitched.
It's just unbelievable that they don't put "HOLD" switches on these things to prevent accidental activation. Makes me believe without hesitation that Toyota's got a design flaw in their control systems when I see crappy form-over-function design like this from a major automaker.
Thanks for your input. I wish the problem was that cheap and that simple.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Green wrote:

How about a tiny nylon washer or O ring under the pushbuttons? That would require more effort to push the button, and reduce accidental activation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<stuff snipped>

That's a good idea, and one I hadn't thought of. I've done the reverse on other things, supergluing a nylon washer collar around buttons that depress too easily. My favorite idiotic design was a Panasonic VCR remote that was designed so that you had to press two REC buttons that were side by side to engage the recording function. Unfortunately, the remote was designed with flowing curves and in such a way that when the remote was put down face down, the entire weight of the unit came down on the two REC buttons at the same time. More than one tape got ruined before I added a fail safe collar to the REC buttons.
Thanks for your input, Jim, it's exactly the kind of "brain storming" idea I was looking for.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Here's what worked for my wife's 2005 Ford Taurus, with the factory installed anti-theft system:
1 - Have an after-market Remote Starter installed. You will get a fob specific to that starter. 2 - Whenever you exit the vehicle, lock the doors with the switch mounted on the door, not with the Remote Starter fob.
You will never accidentally (or intentially) unlock the doors with the Remote Starter fob, because...
The Ford's anti-theft system is set up so that if the doors are locked with internal door switch, it arms the system such that the *only* fob that will unlock the doors is the factory fob, which, of course, is hanging on the hook at home because you only carry the Remote Starter fob.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So, how do you get in?
--
DT



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You have to use the key.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DerbyDad03 wrote:

So what does the remote starter gain you, then? Just leave the fob at home and use the key.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

<stuff snipped>
<<Here's what worked for my wife's 2005 Ford Taurus, with the factory installed anti-theft system:
1 - Have an after-market Remote Starter installed. You will get a fob specific to that starter. 2 - Whenever you exit the vehicle, lock the doors with the switch mounted on the door, not with the Remote Starter fob.
You will never accidentally (or intentially) unlock the doors with the Remote Starter fob, because...
The Ford's anti-theft system is set up so that if the doors are locked with internal door switch, it arms the system such that the *only* fob that will unlock the doors is the factory fob, which, of course, is hanging on the hook at home because you only carry the Remote Starter fob.>>
Not sure I understand this, but as noted, this is a handicapped van and the ramp deployment system requires the fob. It's an integral part of the problem solution and as such, needs to be prevent from opening the door and deploying the ramp onto a car that might be parked next to me.
Thanks for the input, though, DDIII.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The obvious solution is to tie the ramp deployment system into a different fob that doesn't have the same problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<The obvious solution is to tie the ramp deployment system into a different fob that doesn't have the same problem.>
Heck no! (-: It cost extra just to tie the whole thing together in one package. With the number of stinking keys I have to carry already, another fob would burst the seams of my pocket and if it didn't, it would be another thing to press again the buttons of the van fob.
The only problem is that the buttons depress too easily on the existing fobs. Fortunately I believe I have enough suggestions to solve the problem without having to acquire new gear or rewire the ramp deployment system.
Thanks for your input,
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Before you scrape circuit traces or install switches, please try a simple experiment:
Remove the battery for a few hours (as if you had turned off the switch), then reinstall the battery and see what it takes to unlock your minivan.
Many keyless entry fobs use a trickle of battery current to maintain state information (such as where they are in a rolling code). The system can reacquire the state, but it may take multiple presses. Furthermore, since the state after power-off/power-on is likely to be the same each time (for the same fob under similar conditions), you may be defeating the purpose of the rolling code.
I may be wrong, but the experiment is a lot easier than all of the wasted work if I am right.
Good luck!
<snip>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.