facing of cabinet below sink


this is a fairly new cabinet(s)(approx 2yrs) ....but under the kitchen sink the bottom of the facing which includes both door openings is pulling away or has come loose from where it was at one time stapled. (?) At the top of the facing I can see where it is stapled or brad nailed, but the counter top hides these nails, so it doesn't matter. What should I use to 're-fasten' the lower section of the facing. If I shoot a brad or staple in it now, it would be noticeable, right? I really don't know how it was originally put together. On the side of the facing at the cabinets I pulled the staples out which pulled loose from the facing, so now it will be flush. Should I somehow clamp it and put carpenter wood caulk between the face and cabinet? I would appreciate any suggestion! thank you very much!
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MikeL wrote:

Assuming from the description it's a face frame cabinet (a fixed flat piece on the front, that the door hinges are on, not doors on the sides a la "european"), if the staples have pulled out, you'll likely be unable to get anything manually driven to hold long or get them in w/o splitting or at least "swelling" the sides.
I'd first fabricate some small glue blocks (1/2" or larger on a side triangular (or square piece but the triangular is less obtrusive) 2-4" long) to place in the inside corners. Once you have these ready, if you can arrange a way to clamp have those ready as well, otherwise figure out a way to make a brace against an opposite cabinet/wall/whatever to wedge a piece into to hold the face frame in place. Now that you've got stuff all ready, using yellow carpenters glue (or a white glue will also work but I like the yellow aliphatics better) get a good glue on the edge behind the face frame and then get the wedge in place to hold it. Now, glue the square edges of the glue blocks and place them on the inside corner at the bottom and spaced up over the loose area. Good hand pressure and a little wiggle to seat them will be ok; they don't have to be clamped to be effective.
Let dry at least a couple hours before removing your brace. Should be good to go.
If the inside cabinet surfaces are slick (printed vinyl-coated or finish, you'll want to scuff the surface where the glue blocks will go w/ some 80-100 grit sandpaper first to get a good gluing surface.
If you were to have one or be able to borrow one, a brad or pin nailer would let you put a couple of small fasteners thru the face in lieu of the bracing. They would be small enough to not be difficult to fill the holes to be nearly invisible. You could, of course, also drill some small pilot holes and use a 4d or so smaller finish nail but be sure to drill.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, for a little while. Apply glue and re-nail or staple the woodwork back in place. Any small nail/staple hole can be filled with wax from an appropriate colored crayon.... just "pencil"/press it in the hole, rub the "finish" (wax) repair to create heat, softening the wax and sealing the ding. You can touch-up other small furniture dings, like from vacuum cleaners, using this quick fix, also.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If there's water leaking down there from a loose joint, or if water is sloshed around while cleaning, and if the cabinet is made with particle board or MDF, the wet material will expand and pull the cabinet apart. I'm guessing that's what's happening to your cabinet.
Take a picture and post it on one of the free hosting sites, than post the link back here. Let's see what's what before you start running off to fix something while you're half-cocked.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sonny...dpb.... thanks a lot for your suggestion and input...it was very helpful...it has given me great ideas...yes this is cheap cabinetry, current mobile home quality. As 'R' pointed out there probably was water damage, but it is now dried out and I think your suggestions will work. Thanks again for your insight! Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MikeL wrote:

BTW, a quick/easy way for glue blocks if don't have much in way of tools is to chop a piece of quarter-round or shoe mould into suitable lengths.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.