Faceframe on a 45 degree corner cabinet.

This may be a little difficult to explain, bear with me. I'm in the design stage of a corner kitchen wall cabinet which will have a door opening at 45 degrees to the corner in which it will be mounted. It will be a face frame design. While drawing this thing up, I've come to realize that the biscuit method used on my other cabinets may not work 'cause the cab. walls to which the frame will be attached will be at 90 degrees to each other. Pocket screw joinery will be problematical because one element or the other (wall or frame) will be cut at a 45 degree angle. If you sketch it out as I did, you'll see the resulting awkward arrangement for pocket screw setup. The only thing I've come up with so far is attaching some sort of reinforcing block to the wall portion of the cabinet to provide enough meat for biscuit joinery, wherein all the biscuits would go into the frame,and wall ends at 90 deg. angles. It doesn't seem that it would be too difficult to conceal any such reinforcement behind the face frame itself. Just a lot of extra work (unless it's absolutely necessary)
If any of you cabinet building types understand my problem, and have a slick solution, I would greatly appreciate hearing about it.
Good 'ol Bob
my email address has no equal.
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good ol' Bob wrote:

It would be easier to understand if you would put in some whire space as I did. _______________________

OK...

You lost me. The walls could be at 45 degrees to each other? Or are you talking about the cabinet sides? ___________________

What I'd do...
1. Concerning just the cabinet boxes, only difference in the 45 degree one is the bottom
2. Face frame on odd ball cabinet is same as on any other cabinet (and attached to box in whatever manner you prefer) except... (a) door edge sides are cut at angle so that face frame door edge and door edge are parallel (b) the face frame edge in (a) is going to be longer than the door is thick so trim inside projection as necessary - OR - pack out box wall.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.05... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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Also try rec.woodworking
On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 03:31:28 GMT, "good ol' Bob"

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Bob,

I recently built a corner base cabinet for our kitchen that has the door at a 45' angle (relative to the wall).
Because I had to allow for sink clearances, I did not start the angled face frame right at the cabinet edge. My cabinet was more of an "L" shape with the inside corner cut off at a 45 degree angle. In fact, I cut the back corner at a 45 degree angle too so the total depth was about 30". This allowed the finished cabinet to fit through a doorway.
Anyway, where the face frame stiles met in the corners, I ripped the stiles with 22-1/2 degree bevels then used pocket screws to join them together. It worked very well. Because the wood is so thin in the corner area, the screws do slightly penetrate the backside of the corner. But, it's inside the cabinet where no one will ever notice (unless they stick their hand back there and feel).
On the other hand, when I installed the toe kicks I just cut the ends at 45' angles, and overlapped the boards. It worked well too, but it wasn't really a structural situation.
Anthony
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