Face-nailing new roof question??

My question pertains to the ridge part of a new roof just put on by some respected pros in the area....However, if you could indulge me with a "bit" of background...
About 12 years ago, I replaced a shingled shed roof with roll roofing. Following the "package directions, I had some areas of "face-nailing" -- that is nail heads exposed on the top of the bare roofing material.
Regardless the roof was watertight until a big rainstorm last winter. Called a friend who is a retired builder who looked at it and said it would have lasted another 10 or better except for the face-nails...and he acknowledged that many of the roll roofing makers encourage face- nailing....Go figure.
Anyway, I reroofed with three-tab over the roll roofing. No problem. But my buddy mentioned the main house roof was marginal, at best.
So, had a roofing company replace. Seem to have done a good job, but being a paranoid homeowner, when I went up there the other day, saw that the final "half-shingle" that ends the run along the top of the ridge is face-nailed and dabs of what look like silcone sealant are covering the nailheads. Called the roofing company and they said "no problem." My buddy is vacationing in Florida for a couple of months and can't be reached.
I am no roofer. And honestly can't see any other way to finish the ridge, but just wanted to confirm that this is OK>
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snipped-for-privacy@mailworks.org wrote in

I'm no pro roofer either but you're good to go. That's the way it's done. Others I'm sure will confirm this. Personally, I use polyurethane caulk for that since sunlight doesn't degrade it.
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snipped-for-privacy@mailworks.org wrote:

Perfectly fine. That is the correct way to do it. I was impressed that you said they sealed the exposed nails. Most roofers don't even bother to do that. Shows that they care.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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On Feb 12, 2:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@mailworks.org wrote:

Yep, it's okay. Think about it. How much rain hits the ridge? There's only about four inches of slope above those exposed nails. I've never liked the look of exposed nails, nor the dabs of silicone, so I use a dab of roofing cement and smush some loose color granules from the roofing wrappers into the roof cement. Virtually invisible from the ground.
R
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Good tidbit. Thank RicodJour.

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You're welcome. Using the loose color granules is an old trick. On an older roof you can find loose granules in the gutter most of the time. Handy when you need to do a repair.
R
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wrote in

It may be an old trick and I am not a spring chicken but any significant roofing I've done has been only in recent years.
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Red Green wrote:

Here is a good tip;
Get a container of some sort (I like coffee cans) and when the bundles are opened, pour the granules that are in the bottom into the container. Save this for those areas that get damaged by boots or dropped tools, etc. I like to use clear urethane caulk on roofs and you can smear some of this over the gouge or scrape, then sprinkle on the granules and press into place. This helps to seal the shingle and cosmetically repair the damage. (Don't use this for severe damage, just superficial stuff.)
If you forget to collect the granules, you can get them from the gutter, the valleys, or from under the fingernails of anyone that slipped and slid down the roof.
You can also buy the loose granules to match your roofing color from your roofing supply company. They are sold loose to use on EPDM seams in just the same manner.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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They did better then most. The sealer over the nails is a plus, over and above standard practice.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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You are correct. You are going to have exposed nailheads on the first and last ridgecap shingles. When I roofed my garage, I covered the nailheads on the ridgecap with a dab of roofing cement. No need to worry, they did it right.
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On Feb 12, 11:04am, snipped-for-privacy@mailworks.org wrote:

Yes, it is ok. In fact it is the only way to put nails in that last ridge shingle. Same problem occurs on the peaks of hip roofs. I hate hip roofs.
Harry K
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Original poster here:
Thanks for the help. I am now feeling great about the roof. I did send my son up the other day with some "Black Jack" to seal the shingles around the vents (they were not adhering to the steel/somesort of metal) very well and the roof now looks like it has Chicken Pox, but that's only on close inspection since he used too much and it has all spread out from under the shingles.. From the ground you can't see it.
And he meant well, just used too much cement. I gently told him that less would have better but it doesn't hurt anything, so was not too concerned.
Anyway, thanks again for putting my mind at ease.
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