extra 3/8 shut off valve for sink faucet?

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I guess I must be here illegitimately too because I've been here for a long time and use only a web browser for access. I don't see why some folks have to get their shorts all in a knot about how others make their posts.
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On Tuesday, October 9, 2012 4:54:07 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

After reading this about 4 times, I realize he means to crimp the existing, flexible supply line going from the valve to the sink, unhook the end of the hose from the sink, connect a valve t the end of the hose and another hose from the new valve to the sink. That would allow him to install a new valve without shutting off the water. This would do the trick IF it doesn't rupture the hose (which is probably old) and flood the apartment.
However, my guess is it's not necessary. I believe from the OP's description that the old valve is not seized but just doesn't shut off all the way, which means he can remove the hose with causing a serious problem.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/extra-3-8-shut-off-valve-for-sink-faucet-716374-.htm Abacab wrote:
Larry Fishel wrote:

--

Yes. While not expressed as clearly as it could have been this is what I meant.
A kitchen contractor I hired did this and he said he crimped the flexible supply
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message

http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/extra-3-8-shut-off-valve-for-sink-faucet-716374-.htm
Oh, THAT'S what you mean........OK well, go buy a 3/8" x 3/8" compression fitting valve like I posted earlier and another 3/8" faucet supply hose. Use vice grips with metal strips or something else to cover the serrated jaws so the water line isn't damaged, and pinch off the line. Disconnect the supply line from the faucet. Take the compression nuts & ferrules off the new valve and discard. Hook the old supply line to one side of the new valve. Hook one end of the new line to the other ned of new valve, and the other end of new line to the faucet. Remove vice grips.....
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It sounds like a good idea to work with the building onwer, and coordinate to have his plumber do it up during one of the water outages.
With your combination of bad situation, it does sound wise to use the inline shutoff.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I had hoped I didn't have to explain how the tower block in question can't shut off water except to many units at once, and the rare planned turnoff can't delay turning it back on earlier than expected due to the extreme inconvenience to everybody waiting. This troubled bldg has had frequent long unplanned water cutoffs for 6, 12, or 24 hours and anyone wanting an open end down period for amateur plumbing is asking for a lynch mob. I had a lot of trouble getting solder to flow to the heat in a previous house. Better to just opportunistically slam in a screw in patch in series.
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On Monday, October 8, 2012 8:26:02 PM UTC-4, dumbstruck wrote:

But at least mentioning that you lived in a tower block would have saved everyone a lot of guessing. Now we can all just tell you it's the super's problem and you shouldn't be mucking with it. :)
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Dumbstruck:
What about the laundry room(s)?
When you have to shut off the water to some of the apartments to do a repair, are the laundry rooms also affected?
Can you advise the tenants affected by the water outage that they can get hot and cold water for cooking and cleaning (and refilling their toilet tanks) from the laundry room sinks?
--
nestork


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On Saturday, October 6, 2012 6:45:29 PM UTC-4, dumbstruck wrote:

Personally, I would much rather cut into the wall and do it right than hope the packing in the old valve won't fail a year from now while I'm not home. ("Right" IMHO meaning to remove the old valve and extend the pipe out far enough to install a new valve outside the wall where you can replace it easily next time it fails.)
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On 10/6/2012 11:51 PM, Larry Fishel wrote:

extra inline 3/8 x 3/8 shutoff valve to put between your expired copper one and the standard flexible hoses going to sink faucet?

expect) that there's not nearly as much call for a valve like that as you seem to think. Most people, and any plumber who's not overly fond of being sued would consider intentionally leaving an old failed valve in place to be a last resort...

the packing in the old valve won't fail a year from now while I'm not home. ("Right" IMHO meaning to remove the old valve and extend the pipe out far enough to install a new valve outside the wall where you can replace it easily next time it fails.)

That's what I would do. Tile carefully removed can be replaced and OP should be able to do the revealing himself before the plumber shows up and patch after he leaves.
Replacement valve I mentioned was needed to replace a failed valve that had a leak in it and even though it was not frozen and could be shut off the leak was before the shut off in the valve body itself.
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Probably because not too many people would consider putting 2 shutoffs in series.
I certainly wouldn't consider it the "most logically needed valve in the world".

I'm curious what stores you've tried. 'Twere it me, I'd try a contractor's plumbing supply house. If they didn't stock one, they would know where to order it from - if they exist - so there wouldn't be any guesswork as to whether they were compatible or not.
Many kitchen and bath "design centers" have plumbing counters in the back, just like many lighting stores have electrical supply counters. That's where many of the contractors do their business.
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