Exterior Insulation during residing job

Hi, My 1950's house has exterior walls of aluminum siding OVER wood siding over felt on 1x6 sheathing. To make (Hurricane Sandy) repairs consistent with the rest of the house, we plan on having the aluminum siding removed, having the old wood siding beneath removed too, and installing vinyl siding. Some questions: 1. do we need to remove the felt too? or just add tyvek over that? My thought is to remove the felt layer so we can see if any sheathing needs repairs due to rot, etc. 2. Do we put 3/8" fan-fold foam insulation under the new siding? or something thicker for insulation?? Since we're removing the old wood siding too, I figure there's some room available for extra exterior insulation (more substantial than 3/8") but I don't want to start messing with windows and doors too much. Opinions welcome! Regards, Theodore.
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On Saturday 02 February 2013 19:24 snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in alt.home.repair:

I cannot see much point in adding Tyvek over felt as the point of Tyvek is that it is breathable and having felt will defeat that.
I would say strip back and start with fresh Tyvek (or equiv and there are cheaper equivalents).

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On Feb 2, 1:24 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I would prefer aluminum over vinyl. Vinyl can crack when it gets old, and doesn't take paint very well.
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wrote:

Strip off whatever you want, then cover with sheets of foam insulation, its about R6 per inch, make it as thick as possibe, for max energy savings.
I would go with vinyl siding since it wouldnt effect cell phone reception
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snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote the following on 2/2/2013 6:08 PM (ET):

felt on 1x6 sheathing. To make (Hurricane Sandy) repairs consistent with the rest of the house, we plan on having the aluminum siding removed, having the old wood siding beneath removed too, and installing vinyl siding. Some questions:

thought is to remove the felt layer so we can see if any sheathing needs repairs due to rot, etc.

thicker for insulation?? Since we're removing the old wood siding too, I figure there's some room available for extra exterior insulation (more substantial than 3/8") but I don't want to start messing with windows and doors too much.

Aluminum is more easily dented. I haven't seen aluminum siding in quite a few years, but I remember my Aunt's house in NJ had white aluminum siding and you didn't want to touch it, or worse, bump into it with good clothes due to the chalking. Vinyl can be painted. http://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/for-contractors/vinyl-select using
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IIRC, wasn't aluminum siding banned, years ago? Electrically charged somehow, and someone got hurt?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote the following on 2/2/2013 6:08 PM (ET):
Aluminum is more easily dented. I haven't seen aluminum siding in quite a few years, but I remember my Aunt's house in NJ had white aluminum siding and you didn't want to touch it, or worse, bump into it with good clothes due to the chalking. Vinyl can be painted. http://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/for-contractors/vinyl-select using
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On Feb 3, 9:04 am, "Stormin Mormon"

scrapers are steling the alunimum siding off homes overnite to sell for scrap..
So the fellow went on vacation and came home to his siding and all copper gone:( thats happened around here:(
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wrote:

That problem can be easily fixed, if your legislature is so inclined.
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Theodore:
I would remove the roofing felt and put up Tyvek. Roofing felt is impermeable to both humidity and water. Tyvek is a plastic similar to polymethyl methacrylate in that the spaces between the plastic molecules are large enough to allow individual H2O molecules to pass through the Tyvek in either direction, but smaller than the space between H2O molecules in liquid water. So, any humidity that condenses into water or frost can escape through the Tyvek as that moisture evaporates, but the Tyvek will prevent liquid water from getting into the wall structure.
Leaving the roofing felt in place prevents air or humidity from moving in either direction through the wall.
I would insulate with something called "extruded polystyrene foam", which is often abbreviated "XPS". This foam has a stabilized R value of about 5.0 per inch compared to R4.5 per inch for expanded polystyrene foam (the stuff that looks like it's made of "beads") and 3.5 per inch for fiberglas batt.
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Pretty sure Tyvek is polyethylene. It also should not be exposed to sunlight for very long. It was designed NOT to breath air, but pass moisture. I got a car cover made of the stuff. Never used it much.
I'm using a green colored foam on my basement floor. It's a marine grade. It's supposed to be half inch, but measures close to 5/8 inch R3. Lowes green board.
Greg
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On Saturday, February 2, 2013 2:24:34 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
Hi, I'm the O.P. Just to clarify: The intent of my question is not to inquire about the type of siding to use. I've no interest in re-siding with aluminum. Aluminum is more expensive than vinyl; I will be happy to have vinyl; and I have no intention of painting the vinyl. The intent of my question is to ask about what to do under the new siding. Sounds like I should remove the felt (to inspect/repair the sheathing as needed), and sounds like I should add as much foam board insulation as I can possibly deal with at windows and doors.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I vote for removing the felt if, for no other reason, that to access what's under it.
For any spaces under the felt, I'd pack it with the best insulation readily available. Then board-type insulation atop all that. Then Tyvek.
But my mantra is "You can't have too much insulation." Your reasons for existence on this earth may differ, so adjust my suggestion to fit that with which you're comfortable.
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On 2/3/2013 8:42 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

siding to use. I've no interest in re-siding with aluminum. Aluminum is more expensive than vinyl; I will be happy to have vinyl; and I have no intention of painting the vinyl. The intent of my question is to ask about what to do under the new siding. Sounds like I should remove the felt (to inspect/repair the sheathing as needed), and sounds like I should add as much foam board insulation as I can possibly deal with at windows and doors. The old felt on your house probably has no asphalt left in it. It slowly oxidizes over the years and is just felt paper by now. Tear it all off and use Tyvec.
Paul
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