exterior grade paint for the inside of outside siding

Hi
I am going to use this panel
http://www.homedepot.ca/product/lp-smartside-3-8-inch-4-feet-x-8-feet-8-inch-oc-panel/935905
which exterior grade paint do you recommend to protect the siding from winter moisture from inside the house collecting on the back side of the new siding. I basically want to paint the back side of the new siding with an exterior grade paint just to protect it from any moisture that may collect during the cold winter months.
Should I paint the plywood too? just to protect them .. just in case.
Thanks.
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UGH! LP= Louisiana Pacific. Look up Louisiana Pacific class action. Yes, it was settled years ago, and I suppose in another 10 years or so, there will be another class action for their so called "smart siding".
Stay away from the 3/8" composite, go to a lumber store and get 5/8" T1-11 ply.
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On Monday, July 22, 2013 2:55:35 PM UTC-4, Russ N. wrote:

I had never heard about this "smart siding" product until now and was wondering about it myself. For sure T1-11 is widely used and would be a safe choice. As for painting the backside, I don't think anyone in mainstream construction is doing that. If the siding is properly installed, water should not be getting behind it. It wouldn't hurt, but it's extra work and extra cost.
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The sheds you see in Home Depot's parking lots use the LP smart siding. It's OSB, impregnated with a zinc borate compound to ward off fungus and insects, and one faced milled to look like rough sawn T1-11. The trim is basically the same material and it comes pre-primed.
Here's the shed I got for $250 as an open box item:
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/283ec51e19d25b96e535dca99b3bf846_zps1468c1dc.jpg
I also bought the shingles as open packs for $10 a bundle. Even after buying everything that doesn't come with the shed kit (flooring, roofing, etc.) and buying extra wood for sill plates and other upgrade items, I spent less than the regular price of the shed kit alone.
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It is Treated with proprietary SmartGuard® process to help resist rot and termite damage And yes you can paint the back side it ok
But all put Tyvek _Weatherization between house and plywood siding
< http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek_Weatherization/en_US/products/residential/resi_homewrap.html
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The whole idea behind painting the back side of the siding is to prevent the wooden siding from absorbing frost melt in the spring time.
Modern houses are built a lot more air tight than older homes, but even in modern houses there are places where warm moist air escapes into the exterior walls and forms frost. Come spring time, that frost melts and that melt water would otherwise be absorbed by the bare wood on the back of the siding. As that moisture wants to evaporate to the outside, it causes the paint to peel on the exterior painted surface of the siding.
Painting the back side of the siding with a latex paint allows the melt water trapped in the wall to evaporate through the painted wood, but doesn't allow the wood to absorb liquid water. (H2O molecules pass relatively easily through latex paint, but not water. That's because the average distance between H2O molecules in liquid water is much larger than the spaces between the plastic paint molecules.)
If it were me, I would buy any INTERIOR or EXTERIOR latex paint that's been mistinted to the wrong colour for $10 per gallon.
Exterior latex paint is essentially interior latex paint to which mildewcides and UV blockers have been added. On the back side of the siding, you're not going to need UV blockers in the paint because it'll never see daylight. And, you really don't need the mildewcides either because it's only going to be in early spring that there's water inside that wall. Mildew needs WATER to grow, not frost. And, for most of the spring, summer and fall, the interior of the wall will be dry enough that mildew wouldn't grow in there.
So, I'd use a interior or exterior mistint, but I'd buy the exterior mistint before the interior mistint just to be on the super safe side.
--
nestork


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On Monday, July 22, 2013 12:49:08 PM UTC-5, leza wang wrote:

ide-3-8-inch-4-feet-x-8-feet-8-inch-oc-panel/935905 which exterior grade pa int do you recommend to protect the siding from winter moisture from inside the house collecting on the back side of the new siding. I basically want to paint the back side of the new siding with an exterior grade paint just to protect it from any moisture that may collect during the cold winter mon ths. Should I paint the plywood too? just to protect them .. just in case. Thanks.
Leza needs to get her terminology correct. What she calls "plywood" on the existing house is not plywood, it is OSB or particle board from what her p otos show. If she asks at Home Depot or any hardware store about painting plywood, that may get her a different answer than if she asks about paintin g OSB.
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