Exterior Door Seal Question

My exterior doors have an integral weatherstripping in the door jamb. The doors do not seal tightly against the weatherstripping, but could probably be made to do so if the striker plate of the door latch were moved slightly.
The problem I see in moving the striker plate is that it will only require moving approximately 3/32 to 1/8 inch. The striker plate has two screw mounting holes which are round, not slotted, so there is no room for adjustment.
Moving the striker plate would probably require completely filling the existing holes with some substantial material so that new holes can be drilled.
Any ideas on the best approach?
TIA     
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Wayne Boatwright

"One man's meat is another man's poison"
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On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 08:01:39 GMT, Wayne Boatwright

Get some 1/4" dowel and use a 1/4" bit to drill out the old hole. I suggest drilling a 1/4" hole in a piece of scrap wood to test for fit. Apply wood glue, tap into place, flush cut excess, allow to cure and drill the new pilot holes. The cure time will make the area stronger than than before. Use long deck screws for better security.
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On Sun, 05 Apr 2009 08:01:39 GMT, Wayne Boatwright

    You can buy adjustable striker plates. Here is an example.
http://hardware.hardwarestore.com/29-437-strikeplates/adjustable-strike-658507.aspx
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wrote:

It's easy to make a new striker plate with the latch hole offset so that the old mounting screw holes can be used. Easiest is to buy a stainless steel cut off scrap from a sheet metal shop, about .060". If you know someone acquainted with industrial or machine shop supplies that thickness of brass is good. Scribe the pattern of the old plate on the new metal. Drill the new mounting holes. If you bolt the two plates together, then scribing the old latch hole will be quite accurate when marking for the new offset. Cut with hacksaw, countersink screw holes, file edges smooth, install and enjoy. On old installations where the latch has dragged on the door frame trim. the latch guide of the new plate can be extended to hide the imperfection and make operation easier. This works well unless the underlying wood is in such bad shape that Phisherman's technique would be better.
Joe
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wrote:

What sort of weatherstripping is it and does it fit poorly only on the strike side? How to best achieve a tighter seal will depend on what sort of weatherstripping it is and where and how it is attached.
R
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Some striker plates have a tab that bends into the cavity. That tab can be bent judiciously to adjust how tightly the door closes.
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Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I usually just grab for my file when it's that small a move needed. Unless of course it makes it too weak for security.
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