Exterior Door For Pets

Looking to replace an exterior residence door with a door that would be both well insulated and constructed as well as one that would allow the installation of an 18 in x 24 in frame for a "pet door" within the bottom half of the door. This (I believe) rules out wood framed/steel faced doors. The door would be exposed directly to the elements i.e. no exterior storm door. Any ideas? I've heard of solid wood engineered doors, but no knowledge of them locally from any of the few suppliers in the area. Anyone have this same requirement and solved it? thanks
--
Monroe


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have put a pet door in an old solid wood door. We got lucky, and were able to just remove a panel that was the perfect size.
If the "wood framed/steel faced" door is more or less solid wood, then I guess I don't see why you can't put a pet door in it. Anything you do (cutting into a door, wood or metal or whatever) is likely to be permanent anyway. You can use an angle grinder to cut a rectangle in the metal, then a wood saw to cut out the wood insides. Or maybe just a sawzall or sturdy jigsaw to cut through both at the same time. A little caulk when installing the pet door will keep out the rain and snow. of course, the pet door will never really be well insulated.
You may prefer to just go through the wall next to the door. It would be easier in some ways (no metal, no $500 door to ruin), but harder in others (multiple layers of drywall, studs, sheathing, siding, etc.)
-Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Keep in mind that a pet door weakens your security and unless you get a "smart electronic door", you may be setting yourself up for unwanted animals to get in your house.
Beachcomber
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Heed Beachcombers good advice.
I myself know of several people who installed "flapper" pet doors, and they were used by raccoons, squirrels, and even mice to get into homes.
AMUN
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

they
I have a flapper in the door. My dog has serious issues with birds in the yard, cats on the fence, god help the little critter that would even dare enter her home. So far it is Tasha 12 other critters 0. Side note Tasha 5 Birdies 0. She can jump higher and faster than they can get off the ground. Truely a sight to see. I try not to think about what she would do if a person was stupid enough to try the door. Tasha is a wolf hybred and is 140 pounds, just right for a lap dog.
I have used the single flappers and the double flappers. If heating and cooling are a substansial cost yearly then the double flappers are the way to go. Ya gotta cut a hole in the wall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Beachcomber wrote:

I added a vertical board to my sliding glass door going from my kitchen out onto the deck, then cut and installed a flapper door in it. The sliding glass door stayed stock. With staining, the vertical board looked like it was an integral part of the house and I never had a problem with thievery. I did have a problem with raccoons once my cat got too old to defend the homestead. That was the end of the kitty door... though I had used it successfully for many years.
Now I have a dog that would gladly eat a visitor alive. I don't dare let her roam at will.... couldn't afford the lawsuits....
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

snipped-for-privacy@carolina.rr.com.barf
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 30 Sep 2005 13:51:45 -0400, "Mortimer Schnerd, RN"

get
unwanted
kitchen out onto

glass door

an integral

have a problem

was the end

years.
let her

I have had a pet door for over 20 years for my cats and dogs. If I could redesign one, I would put it in the wall next to the door, with some kind of a ramp leading up to the pet door and some sort of little steps coming down on the other side. That would eliminate rodents.
I also would have not encouraged my dogs to use it at all. We have a puppy with very muddy paws and I wish I could regulate when she came in and out more so, but the older dog would be far too confused. I think Pet Doors are ideal for cats. It makes their world so wonderful. IMHO Dogs really don't need it.
with aloha, Thunder the dog smithfarms.com Farmers of 100% Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I get a feral cat now and then, in through the cat door. I tried to adopt them, but the resident cats (3) would not permit it, nor would the dog when she was young.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The ones that are activated by a pet collar are nice, your pet wears a magnet or something and the door only opens for them. Those come as in-door or wall models I think. I think they are hooked up to an electrical circuit.
I recently bought one of those HD Stanley metal doors for an odd-sized opening. The door was standard 80"h x 30"w and I cut the bottom off the bottom about 2" with a cheap circular saw blade (for ferrous metal I think). It was easy to cut, the inside is filled with foam and the metal facing was only about 1/16" thick, not sure.
If you want to go that route get one of these doors from HD for about $120. Rough out the opening for the pet door using a 1/2" drill bit on the corners and a circular saw to start the sides. Make multiple passes over the metal on each side of the door, you won't cut through on one pass.
Near the corners you will need a hack saw or a sawzall with a metal cutting blade to back into the corners. File down the metal on the rough opening.
Make sure the facia on the pet door allows at least a 1/4" or more of slop in the rough opening.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.