Extending toilet waste flange

The PVC toilet waste flange is now way too low with the new floor/tile. How can I raise it an inch without cutting the PVC and gluing a new flange (it's not accessible, so I can't cut it)? Should I buy one of those extenders from HD and push it on? Won't that make the waste hole thinner than 3"? Are they reliable? They say they don't need a wax ring -- do I believe that, or should I place one on top of it anyway? Is there a neat tool which I could use the cut the PVC from the inside, then slide on a new PVC and glue it? Thanks!
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GeekBoy wrote:

There is indeed a neat tool to cut the pipe from inside. You'll probably have to ask at a plumbing supply house. There is also a flange with an extended "neck" available so that you can slip it right over the now shortened pipe.
I don't like to see closet connectors less than 3" used, although 2" has been done successfully and many new toilets have narrowed outlets.
There are "flange extenders" (Oatey) which you can layer on top of the existing flange as another possible solution.
Jim
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I recently had this same problem after laying tile. Lowe's had a flange extender (just the collar without the short section of pipe attached) for a few dollars. I found that you should also get a second wax gasket and put it between the original flange and the extender. Run the bolts up from the ORIGINAL flange, through the wax, through the extender to secure the stool. Use the second wax gasket on the stool horn as per the directions.
You may also, optionally, line up the screw holes on both flanges to secure both of them to the subfloor. However this is not necessary as the t-bolts will hold the whole thing tight.
Nary a leak has been found.
Chris
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On Wed, 7 Jul 2004 22:20:10 +0000 (UTC), Chris

I did something similar, but I put a thick bead of silicone calk/adhesive between the two flanges. I also made sure to wipe any caulk that oozed out between the flanges. In my case, the holes from the new flange were not set at the same position as the new flange, so I drilled new holes through the old flange and used long brass screws to secure the new flange to the floor.
Gary Dyrkacz snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net Radio Control Aircraft/Paintball Physics/Paintball for 40+ http://home.attbi.com/~dyrgcmn /
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