Experience with infrared quartz heater

Want to improve heating my house-at lower cost. The inrared quartz heater sounds good. Anyone have experience with this heater?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If you want to heat your entire house, most of the time electricity in any form of direct heater will be the most expensive way to heat. The savings promised from all these wonder plug in heaters comes from the trade of heating a room or an object (ie people) instead of the entire house.
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Quartz infrared lamps are great for a garage or other area where you want to heat people or things, but not the air. As a bonus, they give out a lot of light and lamp life is virtually indefinite. But electric BTUs are expensive and I keep the burning hours short.
This type of heating does not make much sense for heating a whole house. For one thing, with quartz infrared lamps, the heat is focused, not general. If a house is to be heated with electric heat, I've found that baseboard units work the best since they're usually placed to cancel out the heat lost through perimeter walls and floors.
TKM
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They produce heat very efficiently. They are good for one room or area. In most locations, electric is very expensive and it will not save any money, but you get one comfy room and the rest of the house cold for the same money as burning oil or gas for the entire home. Not knowing your utility cost, how much you want to heat, temperature, etc. it is not possible to make accurate suggestions. .
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

A 5000 watt quartz heater produces exactly the same amount of heat as a 5000 watt resistive coil heater. Virtually all electric heaters produce the same amount of heat for a given wattage.
I could imagine some with a 100-watt fan producing only 4900 watts of heat, but that's about the extent of the difference. Even then, if the fan "consumes" 100 watts, the fan is converting it to heat, so no real loss there.
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wrote:

But. . . if you sit directly in front of the quartz version you will feel warmer. [if it really is emitting IR in the right spectrum- the best won't give off any light and will be about 120-30 degrees if memory serves]
Jim
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