Expansion Joints In Brick Buildings?

The other day I was parked outside a local Recreation Center that was built no more than 10 years ago. The 2 story building was either brick or brick faced. I noticed something I don't recall ever seeing on a brick building before.
The wall I was looking at had 2 banks of large windows on the first floor and a double-door entry way in the middle. Picture 2 conference rooms on either side of the entryway, with almost wall to wall, almost floor to ceiling windows. There were no windows or openings on the second floor.
Along the left edge of the entry way and each bank of windows, there appeared to be an expansion joint, filled with an off-white material, running from the top left corner of the opening straight up to the roof line.
I'll tell ya, it didn't look very nice. If you can picture where these joints were (along the left edge of each opening) you can see that they were not evenly spaced along the building, so they looked very out of place. They broke the second story brick wall up into 3 uneven sections.
My grandfather was a mason who built some the massive brick paper factories in Massachusetts as well as a number of brick houses. As far as I recall, none of these buildings had expansion joints like the one's on this rec building.
Anybody have an idea of why this was done?
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Steel supporting structure? A lot of newer buildings have a steel frame and are essentially a big pole barn with brick or block curtain walls.
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Look at the BIA (Brick Industry Association) web site Tech Notes. I have seen recent (1960 or 70 ) buildings that have suffered from expansion. T
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The joints look very much like Figure 6 of Section 18A. It's a shame that they have to break up the beautiful flow of a brick wall by placing the expansion joints unevenly across the face. It would almost seem worth the expense to add more, perhaps on both sides of all openings, if only for the asthetics. Of course, this might create a whole different set of structural issues that would have to dealt with.
Thanks for pointing me to that site. I wish Grandpa was still around so I could talk to him about it. I miss him.
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