Exhaust fan / light wiring question

Hi
I purchased a Mistral 6300-0 exhaust fan/light to replace an older version of the same unit in the bathroom. I'm not sure on the wiring and was stupid enough not to note the existing setup, which worked with the exact same make and model fan!!
The fan has four connections marked L, N, F, E (light, neutral, fan, earth). The neutral is shared by both the light and fan.
A single switch was used to switch both the fan and light at the same time.
The house wires comprise 3-core flex with an active, neutral and earth and a separate 2-core active and neutral. The separate active/neutral is closed (ie shorted) when the switch is in the on position otherwise an open circuit. I think the 3-core active, neutral, earth has power at all times (I think).
Your assistance would be greatly appreciated.
PS. Product brochure, if required, can be found at http://alfred.clipsal.com/scripts/apeweb.dll?LaunchBrochure&ID !21
Cheers Chris Malone
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Chris Malone wrote:

hereafter known as (*F*ixture) FL, FN, FF, FE

hereafter known as (*P*ower) PA, PN, PE

hereafter known as (*S*witch) SA and SN

THat sounds right.

PE <> FE
PN <> FN
FL and FF <> SA PA <> SN
In addition, "Switch Neutral" should be identified by a piece of black electrical tape or a Black band applied with permanent marker as a "Black" wire, it is interrupting the hot side of the circuit which is all black wire. Never get the switch involved with the White (neutral) side of a circuit. FYI: the practice of marking the White wire as Black is both OK by code and considered "good workmanship" by most folks.
--
The real Tom Pendergast [ So if you meet me, have some courtesy,
aka I-zheet M'drurz [ have some sympathy, and some taste.
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This sounds exactly right. However judging by the question, the original poster would benefit from reading a basic wiring textbook before jumping in. Don't forget to be sure the ground (PE) is also attached to the box in some way.
Dave

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Hi Tom and guys
Thanks so much for your advice! I have it all working perfectly by following your wiring instructions.
I am in Australia, most devices comply to the IEC wiring colours brown, blue and green with yellow stripe. The house uses the old red, black and green coding, which was in use here until at least 1969 from what I understand.
Thanks again!
Cheers Chris Malone

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Australia? In the US I would say you are confused; the light has no use for an unswitched hot, so there must be a switch somewhere. But maybe Australian lights are different.
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toller wrote:

Think "ceiling fan". It's set up so you can control the light and fan with 2 separate switches (probably the most common way of installing it).
But I gotta admit, the way he refered to the wires threw me too!
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aka I-zheet M'drurz [ have some sympathy, and some taste.
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It is probably set up for either situation, as needed.
Dave

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