Evaporator coil orientation question

I have a client with a horizontal flow air-handler that has his A-frame evaporator with the air flow coming from the head of the A. The A-frame evaporator has been installed on its side (imagine the letter A turned exactly 90 degrees) instead of on its back (imagine the letter A lying on its back). I have never seen an evaporator installed this way and suspect that it is wrong. Can anyone give me any information please?
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Sounds strange. Where does the water condensate go?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I have a client with a horizontal flow air-handler that has his A-frame evaporator with the air flow coming from the head of the A. The A-frame evaporator has been installed on its side (imagine the letter A turned exactly 90 degrees) instead of on its back (imagine the letter A lying on its back). I have never seen an evaporator installed this way and suspect that it is wrong. Can anyone give me any information please?
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On Tuesday, August 21, 2012 3:23:07 PM UTC-7, Stormin Mormon wrote:

To the pan below the coil, what else?
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On Aug 21, 6:06pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

so the one side of the a-coil is laying in the pan??
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On Tuesday, August 21, 2012 4:13:01 PM UTC-7, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

No only the foot of the A is. I did say the letter A turned exactly 90 degrees NOT 135 degrees.
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The A coils I've seen, that would put the condensate tray on the side.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
No only the foot of the A is. I did say the letter A turned exactly 90 degrees NOT 135 degrees.
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On Aug 21, 9:17pm, "Stormin Mormon"

how is the coil set at 90, when the A is upright, it rests on the pan, at 90 something must be holding it up
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On Tuesday, August 21, 2012 9:21:01 PM UTC-7, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Frame of the coil is rigid so thats not hard to do. The frame can be screwed on to the housing in any orientation. My guess is that the installer couldnt get the lines to come out in the direction that he wanted so to make it easy on himself he removed the coil from its housing, turned it 90 degrees and re-inserted it back into its housing. Here is a picture of a normal coil with housing. Just imagine removing the coil, turning it 90 degrees and re-inserting it into the same housing.
http://s3.pexsupply.com/images/products/zoom/goodman-chpf-evaporator-coil.jpg
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On Tue, 21 Aug 2012 16:17:35 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you want help, you're going to have to talk nicer to these people. Two of your four posts so far have a measure of sarcasm. Above, it's not necessary to prove you said it right the first time, nor to go into numeric detail when you try to do so.
Does the AC function as expected? Or do you think there is a problem related to the air coming to the A from the top versus the bottom. I'll admit that that is not the same as bloging in one end of a straw versus blowing in the other end, but in general I don't see why it should matter.
Even if someone with experience here said, " I think it's better if the air comes in through the bottom of the A", I don't think that's enough to warrant charging a customer to turn the evaporator around, even if it were easy, and even you think it will be hard.
Look at their webpages, and if that doesn't answer your questoin, call the manufacturer of the A-frame and ask a tech if it matters which way t he air goes.
Is the AC newsgroup still around?
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On Tuesday, August 21, 2012 10:49:46 PM UTC-7, micky wrote:

The problem was that the evaporator was freezing over. It may have been because most of the registers were closed. It remains to be seen if it was due to that or some other reason. I will be waiting to hear from my client. It seems to me however that in its present configuration the top leg of the A blows the condensate on to the bottom leg and would cause a restriction in the air flow and to eventually cause it to freeze over. I apologize to anyone who may feel that I wasnt nice but sometimes I get frustrated when I think for an hour as to how to put something into words that I hope will be understood but get misunderstood anyway. I didnt see a name plate on the coil. There may be one inside its housing but I didnt want to waste my time taking it apart if my theory is wrong. If anyone knows the exact name of the AC newsgroup I would appreciate it.
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Coil freezing over, is often due to reduced air flow. Or, oddly enough, can be due to low freon. Sometimes due to a restriction in the freon line.
The AC group is alt.hvac but most of those folks read here, too.
Would you like to *do* something about the freezing over? Or, is that just something you mention in passing? Maybe freezing over isn't a concern?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
The problem was that the evaporator was freezing over. It may have been because most of the registers were closed. It remains to be seen if it was due to that or some other reason. I will be waiting to hear from my client. It seems to me however that in its present configuration the top leg of the A blows the condensate on to the bottom leg and would cause a restriction in the air flow and to eventually cause it to freeze over. I apologize to anyone who may feel that I wasnt nice but sometimes I get frustrated when I think for an hour as to how to put something into words that I hope will be understood but get misunderstood anyway. I didnt see a name plate on the coil. There may be one inside its housing but I didnt want to waste my time taking it apart if my theory is wrong. If anyone knows the exact name of the AC newsgroup I would appreciate it.
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On Aug 22, 4:16am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Good grief. Of course if you close off most of the registers there is a good chance you're going to freeze the coils. Surely that will do more to reduce the airflow than the air flowing through the coil backwards. Also, if it were the coil orientation, how long has it been installed? If the coil has been there for a substantial time and this problem is new, it would suggest that it's not the coil orientation.
The units I've seen, I have never seen a coil installed that way though. Very likely it was installed wrong. Did you google for the install manual?
I will be waiting to hear from my client. It seems to me however that in its present configuration the top leg of the A blows the condensate on to the bottom leg and would cause a restriction in the air flow and to eventually cause it to freeze over.
I would think it would take a hell of a lot of condensate for the condensate to significantly reduce the airflow. Likely more than the unit could produce. It's not like water is coming out at 1 GPM.

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Yes, alt.hvac is still around.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Is the AC newsgroup still around?
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On Wed, 22 Aug 2012 08:12:07 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
Thanks you two. I found it. It wasn't in my selected groups, I guess because I changed computers a year ago, and I'd forgotten its name. .

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The quality of manners there, about the same.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:>Yes, alt.hvac is still around.
Thanks you two. I found it. It wasn't in my selected groups, I guess because I changed computers a year ago, and I'd forgotten its name. .

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Most A coils I've worked with, the condensate pan is on the open end of the A. So, if the coils is like a > orientation, the pan is on the side.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

To the pan below the coil, what else?
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