Evaporative Cooler putting too much humidity into my house

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Title says it. I live in CO and have a ductless home. It's heated through hot water heat/radiators. Problem with my swamp cooler is that it's getting my indoor humidity up to 70% or more which is much higher than the outside RH. Will opening more windows help the humidity go down? The problem is the humidity is really messing up the tuning and position of the necks on my electric guitars. It's not good for this wood to constantly expand and contract during the seasons. Anyone else experience thiss? Were you able to change something that allowed you to get closer to the 45-50% range?
Thanks,
Matt
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That is how they work. The more cooling they provide the more water they will be adding to the air. If you want less humidity, and I would, then you reduce the use of the swamp cooler or switch to an air conditioner. I don't know what all may be available in your area or work best.
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Its not going to hurt the instruments, it will just as you know change neck bow and tuning, maybe get a window unit it will cool and dehumidify.
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On Wed 23 Jul 2008 10:11:06p, Mtmartin71 told us...

I'm not sure why, living in CO, you chose to use an evaporative cooler, as they are only really effective where the humidity is extremely low, as in AZ where I live. Even I won't have one because I don't want that much humidity in the house, and they aren't as effective at cooling as is an air conditioner. Adding that much humidity to an enclosed space will encourage mold and mildew growth, a decidedly unhealthy situation. I would rip it out and install A/C, as I don't know of anything else to remedy the situation. The negative tradeoff, however, is higher installation and operating cost.
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snip

snip
Living in Denver CO the last 34 years with a swamp cooler, I can tell you they work just fine here. (and I prefer it after 1 year of A/C in Chicago.) We do have low humidity, but not the 100+ temps of AZ. That's when you need A/C vs cooler.
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On Thu 24 Jul 2008 06:57:19p, Reed told us...

To some extent preference follows what you're used to. Many people in the Phoenix area have both a swamp cooler and a/c. They use the swamp cooler during most of the hot weather except when our monsoon hits with high humidity. Then they switch to a/c. If you have low humidity, a swamp cooler is fine if you like it. If you have average or high humidity, a swamp cooler can destroy your home.
My dad was an HVAC engineer, beginning in the early 1940s. I can't remember ever living in a home without a/c. This certainly drives my preference, even though a swamp cooler would work fine for me here in Phoenix during most of the season, I wouldn't like it.
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wrote:

A swamp cooler can only be used the the temps are below about 100. Above that, the evaporating water can't cool the air stream enough to keep indoor temps below 90.
For phoenix, it means that swamp coolers are only usefull from march to may, and from october (after monsoon season ends) to november.
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wrote:

They're great for dry climates. Where I've used them in Colorado and New Mexico, they work like a champ.
The air doesn't get that humid if you don't let it build up.
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On Fri 25 Jul 2008 05:17:32a, AZ Nomad told us...

You're absolutely right, but what they can't do is keep my house at an even 68-70F., which is what I prefer. Providing relief from extreme heat, yes. Maintaining a controlled and dehumidified environment, doubtful.
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wrote:

When I lived in Colorado, I had a swamp cooler w/ a 3/4hp motor for 2000 sq. feet of home. It was on a thermostat so at least the temperature in the living room was constant. The rest of the house was equalized by opening/closing windows.
Keep in mind that running a swamp cooler costs about $30-50/month versus $200-300/mo for refrigerated air. It's also a heck of lot cheaper to install a swamp cooler to a house that lacks an existing cooling system.
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et> wrote:

Guys,
How many windows should I be opening? I have a two story home at about 1800 total square feet and then also about 500 sq feet of finished basement. My humidity in the basement hit near 80%! Now that I've turned the damn thing off, it's dropped below 70% in the basement. The house feels sticky and damp and it's a complete pain in the a$$ for my guitars. I couldn't find the dang documents to see the model and specs, but I'm pretty sure the guy spec'd me the right type and it wasn't a home depot job. This is one of those coolers that has just one panel opening that you can put a closed panel on for the winter (vs. the fully open ones you see at Home Depot that require a cover).
Anyhow, the one thing I can use it for without adding moisture is to circulate cold night air through my house with just the fan function. I'll see what this other HVAC guy has to say and just go from there.
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wrote:

Guys,
How many windows should I be opening? I have a two story home at about 1800 total square feet and then also about 500 sq feet of finished basement. My humidity in the basement hit near 80%! Now that I've turned the damn thing off, it's dropped below 70% in the basement. The house feels sticky and damp and it's a complete pain in the a$$ for my guitars. I couldn't find the dang documents to see the model and specs, but I'm pretty sure the guy spec'd me the right type and it wasn't a home depot job. This is one of those coolers that has just one panel opening that you can put a closed panel on for the winter (vs. the fully open ones you see at Home Depot that require a cover).
Anyhow, the one thing I can use it for without adding moisture is to circulate cold night air through my house with just the fan function. I'll see what this other HVAC guy has to say and just go from there.
--
a rule of thumb is that the exit openings have to be the same size as the
duct that leads from the cooler into the house.
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wrote:

There should be enough air pressure to hold a tissue against a window screen. Keep opening windows until the pressure/flow is too low. Open windows on the house opposite the swamp cooler most, while keeping the pressure great enough to hold a tissue against the window screen.
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On Fri 25 Jul 2008 07:20:36a, AZ Nomad told us...

I concur with you on all points. I just don't like them. :-) I would rather spend the additional money and get what I want. We have a small home, 1600 sq. ft. We have a new house that is heavily isulated. Our cooling bills are below average.
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Sure they can, with suitable weather and a thermostat and a humidistat.
How many gph would you need to evaporate and how many cfm would you need to ventilate to provide 5000 Btu/h of net cooling in Prescott AZ in June, with 70 F indoor air and 85 F outdoor air with a 0.0047 humidity ratio?
Nick
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On Fri 25 Jul 2008 12:55:34p, told us...

I wasn't talking about Prescott; I was talking about Phoenix. So, "suitable weather" is the issue. The hot weather season is longer and considerably hotter in Phoenix. Probably wouldn't be suitable for anything other than Spring and Fall. And...any amount of added humidity to the air in my house is more than I want.
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wrote:

Here in phoenix, I've considered a swamp cooler just as a source of humidity for the first part of summer, before monsoon season, where the RH is typically below 5%. You don't have to brush a metal object to see a spark. Touch a painted drywall wall, and they'l be a spark. My wife and I have made a habbit of touching hands first to discharge static electricity before a goodbye kiss. Those 1" sparks hurt!
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On Fri 25 Jul 2008 05:46:39p, AZ Nomad told us...

Yes, those sparks can hurt and take you by surprise. I suppose a swamp cooler is a good solution for introducing some humidity. We have a humidifier installed in our furnace, and even when we don't need the heat, I will sometimes run just the blower which will allow the humidifier to run. That's as much humidity as I care to have.
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Sure. There are times when evaporative cooling can keep your house exactly 70 F, and times when won't work, when your computer might AC instead. How many gph would you need to evaporate and how many cfm would you need to ventilate to provide 5000 Btu/h of net cooling in Phoenix in May, with 70 F indoor air at 50% RH and 75 F outdoor air with a 0.0045 humidity ratio? If 1000P = 5000 + (75-70)C with P lb/h of water and C cfm and P = 60C0.075(wi-wo) with indoor humidity ratio wi = 0.00787, C = 66P, so 1000P = 5000 + 330P, ie P = 7.5 lb/h (0.9 gph) and C = 492 cfm.

Philosophy vs comfort? :-) Sounds irrational...
Nick
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On Sat 26 Jul 2008 03:05:03a, told us...

I don't have a swamp cooler, don't want a swamp cooler, and if I can set the a/c termostat and know that regardless of outside conditions I will always have 70 indoors, I'm totally satisfied.
Swamp coolers are cheaper to operate, yes, but I can afford to operate the a/c and I like the results, so why bother. And, yes, it's a bother. Maintaining the swamp cooler takes more time and effort. The extremely high mineral content of the local water fouls up the inside, and there's greater risk of mold spores developing.
If you think that's irrational, that's fine by me.
BTW, do you sell these thing?
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