Estimated Running Time For Snow Blower

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Assume 342 cc engine with 5 qt. fuel capacity. How many minutes running time to exhaust the fuel?
Same question with 420 cc engine, 5 qt. capacity. Thanks, Jack
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Dude, fill it up, just carry a gas can with you -- and a watch. Very difficult to predict something like that, even if it were just idling the whole time.
--
EA



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wrote:

42
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wrote:

that must be right since 42 is the answer to the meaning of life, the universe, and everything.
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Hey, I didn't understand the question. And, what's that dolphin doing at my front door, asking for a fish. No, wait. He's thanking me for a fish? I'm totally confused. Now, I've got to find my towel, and a pack of salted peanuts. That's what the guy with two heads is telling me. Something about Vogons.
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On Wed, 23 Dec 2009 18:21:29 GMT, stayin@home. (Way Back Jack) wrote:

If both are idling, the 420 will run out of gas first. Depending on the snow they are moving, the 342 could run out first.
Is there some reason why it matters?
I switched engines on my 20-something yr old snowblower last winter. Put a sweet 30 yr old 7 hp on instead of the 8hp it came with. the gas tank on the 7hp is 1/2 the size of the other. I was sure it would drive me nuts to have such a small tank-- but a winter and a half later I'm still using the smaller tank. I fill it about 1/2way through my driveway/paths.
In the big scheme of how much work there is to moving a few tons of snow, filling the tank is a minor thing. Same for time taken to do the job- 2 hours blowing snow- 5 minutes filling tank twice.
Jim
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wrote:

It's just that the driveway is over 600' long and on a very steep hill. I don't want to make one pass and end up with an empty tank at the bottom of the hill. Perhaps the thing to do is just go 50-100 ft., make four passes and then fill-up. Do it in 50-100 ft. chunks before filling up each time.
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On Dec 23, 3:00pm, stayin@home. (Way Back Jack) wrote:

How fast it consumes fuel depends to a large extent on the load. These engines have governors and with a heavy load the throttle is going to be open more than with a light load. It's like asking how far a truck engine will go on a gallon of fuel without knowing whether it has no cargo and is cruising at 55 on a flat highway or it's struggling up a steep grade with a full load.
Why not just make a roundtrip down the 600 ft driveway and then check how much fuel is left. That will give you an idea of when to check it again.
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I'm remembering a friend of mine who was mowing lawn on a rider. Said the tank on the mower was enough to do the lawn. Except for the one day when the grass was higher, and he had to gear down a bit. Ran out of gas on the far end of the lawn, and had to come walking back for the gascan. I figure it's easier to have a one galon "get home" tank onboard.
They used to make in the tank gas gages. Bit of a float, on a spiral metal that turned the gage. Wonder if those are still sold. Then, the OP could watch his gas level as he was working.
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Way Back Jack wrote: ...

So run a feed line down the hill from the bulk tank at the top w/ a gravity-feed dispenser nozzle... :)
--
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Way Back Jack wrote:

If you're running full throttle the whole time as you likely would on a large driveway the tank will probably last 45 minutes or so. If the snow is particularly heavy and the engine is working hard perhaps 30 min.
I'd guestimate that you'd probably do ok if you just top the tank off after each round trip down the driveway and back which would probably be near the 30 min mark.
The simple solution is to put a larger tank on it. You'll need to fabricate some mounting brackets, but you shouldn't have any problem putting a 2.5-5 gallon tank on it. You can find tanks at Northerntool and others.
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stayin@home. (Way Back Jack) wrote:

-snip-
Now that we know why- I'd say go with the bigger engine just because it won't be working as hard as the smaller one. 600 feet is a long driveway.
I'm just wild-ass-guessing here, but I suspect you can do several passes in most storms on a tank of gas. Keep an eye on it in different conditions and you'll likely be able to gas up every 3-4th pass most of the time.
I'll bet a 6"snowfall at 10degrees will use 1/2 the gas that 6" at 32 degrees will use.
Worst case, I might consider adding some tank capacity-- walking 600' uphill in a snowstorm isn't fun. [but at least there should be a path by then.<g>]
For a shot at somebody knowing how long those two engines might run try these guys- http://www.opeonthenet.com/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=1&sid d912ec3565b8d6f8d8d5af0cb5f022 http://www.abbysguide.com/ope/discussions /
With that much driveway to keep clean you'll appreciate their expertise at some point. Are you changing engines, or buying a new machine?
If you're buying a new machine- you might want to throw your 'specs' out there [how big and hilly your driveway is- is this your only snowblower- where you live- what kind of physical shape you're in] and see if those guys have some suggestions.
Jim
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wrote:

Thanks for sharing your knowledge and I'll check out the references you cited.
This snow blowing will be a new experience. For 33 years, a farmer with a huge John Deere has plowed the driveway but his prices have zoomed up, e.g., $225 this past weekend although it was an 18" snowfall. Total time expended was less than 10 minutes. Also, he does increasingly sloppy work, e.g., clearing an 8' wide path this weekend, only 4' of it was on the asphalt. The other 4' was on dirt/grass.
I'm 65 but active and in good shape. E.g., it takes 5 hrs. to mow the grass including an hour walking behind a self-propelled hand mower.
Thanks again, Jack
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With those prices, you'll pay for your ride on snow blower in a hurry. Might even get a riding mower with snow blower atachment, and do both off the same machine. And the lack of quality service is an issue.
I havn't worn a snowmobile suit ever, but I've heard they are suitable for riding snow throwers, too. Help keep your feet warm while you're working.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Check out the prices of these things: http://tinyurl.com/yaw3pcn New ones are well over $200K from what I've been hearing.
Granted, the farmer is just making extra money with his.
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stayin@home. (Way Back Jack) wrote in (Way Back Jack) wrote:

Put a can of gas at the bottom?

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Might be able to put a 2 1/2 gal gascan under a recycle box, turned upside down. Back from the road a ways. Won't attract much attention. And if you knew the gas was there, it would be comforting.
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How'z about get a 1 gal gascan at the store, and wire it to the handle of the snow blower? Should be enough fuel to get you back to the garage after the engine tank runs out.
Like the old Volkswagens that had the secondary tank. You ran the main tank out, turned the valve, and then looked for a gas station, in a hurry.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

If I remember right from my motorcycle days, there was reserve fuel in the tank. You would flip the fuel valve 90 from the normal ON position to gain access to the reserve fuel. I don't know why lawn equipment manufacturers couldn't do the same thing. Perhaps a modification is called for utilizing a valve from a scooter?
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

The answer is simple: $$$
I don't know of anyone taking a snowblower on cross country trips so I don't see the big deal. Make a few passes, take a look in the tank and top it off and you know pretty much all you'll ever need to know. Oh, look at your watch too so you have a good time estimate.
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