Establishing Property Line For A Fence

Page 3 of 3  
I assume you are asking what the stake does look like and how deep it may be.
It will usually be a 1/2"diameter rebar or smooth steel pin, often with a plastic surveyor's cap (yellow) on the top of the stake. It will usually be 8-12" below grade. If you have a strong reason to guess at the corner location based on other fences, street set back, etc you should be able to dig down to find the stake in one bite of the shovel.
If you miss, the yard can quickly look like gophers have taken up permanent residence.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

stake
Around here they are 3/4" rebar 18" or 24" long (I can't recall) and are pounded flush with the ground at initial set. They have a plastic cap, color varies, with the surveyors name printed on it. Over time they tend to be lower in the ground as landscaping and sediment occurs. More than 5 years after the fact you would be lucky to find the cap let alone read it.
Most locate services use a metal detector in the general area they believe the boundary to be and then dig when they find metal.
Front line boundaries are more difficult because they are generally referenced, depending on locality, from the center of the roadway or from the curb. Curb pins are usually nothing more than a PK nail nailed into the curb. They don't last long. You can check this by locating your rear boundary and measuring towards the street the distance referenced on your plat. Your tape will not provide the same accuracy as the surveyors equipment, (grades affect this more than flat land).
An interesting side story. A few years back, a neighbor and I were having a discussion over who owned a retaining wall that fell. I was and still am sure that it was his wall even though I spent a lot of money and time rebuilding it. The property was platted in 1906 on the side of a sharp hill. Using modern methods and equipment I owned that d&%$ wall. I think they used chains in 1906. By that method the wall would have been his. I refrained from asking the surveyor if he thought the original surveyor used the same model as he did.
Colbyt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
Thanks!
I like to find the stake at the corner of our property. This is the "starting point" for the fifty plus homes subdivision. The "stake" is on a higher ground (2' to 4') beside a ditch and pebble's road to leading to my neighbors' farm. The areas have since eroded, with yours and DanG description, I doubt could find the stake now.
BTW, the houses here were built in the early eighties.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"starting
ground
farm.
could find

Most likely not. A licensed surveyor could.
Most modern starting point references also include a latitude-longitude reference.
Colbyt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One other thing to check into: Some communities have no restrictins on fences in back yards, but prohibit fences from the backyard forward towards the street. It's a pretty common restriction.
BB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.