Establishing Property Line For A Fence

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I'm about to extend my backyard wood privacy fence. The fence now stops at the back of the house. I want to extend it 20 feet going towards the street.
Since there is no old fence on the 20 feet of yard I'll be working on, I need to make sure where the property line is. I have the diagram from the 1993 survey which says there are iron rods in place.
Do you think I'm safe to just find the rod myself and pull a string tight between it and the last post on the old fence?
Or should I pay for a survey? I've heard that you can get a survey a little cheaper by calling the original survey company and just have them do an update.
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So what did they quote? Mine was $100 / hr to reestablish a line.
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I have not called the survey company yet. But I'm glad to know that pricing info, thanks. If it's that much, I'll probably just find it myself, then go a few inches in just to be safe.
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Also, make sure the line is in fact ON the rod. Sometimes they're displaced.
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Well, since I'm using the rod to _find_ the line, how do I use the line to make sure the rod is not displaced as you say?
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James Madison III wrote:

It is designated on the survey.
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James Madison III wrote:

The rod is pretty long driven deep. Won't move easily. Tony
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James Madison III wrote:

Usually you put a fence a few inches inside the property line, just so there is no issue about whose property it's on. Ideally you would find both iron rods on that side (front corner and back corner) and run a string between them -- that is the property line -- then put the fence just inside that. The rods are often buried a couple inches deep but are usually not too hard to find if you know generally where it should be. Of course, they are easy to find with a metal detector!
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Yes, I can see how doing a string between the front and back iron rods would be best. I would have to destroy about 80 feet of fence to do that though :(
I think I'll tie on to the front rod, then tie on to the last fence post, then go a few inches in just to be safe as you suggested. Thanks for the info.
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Tie a line from the front of the property to the rear, putting in a temporary stake about a foot or so outside the property stakes. Then measure in a foot to make sure you are clearanced properly at any given point on the property line. This should eliminate having to tear down fence to make sure things are done properly. There is nothing better than knowing first hand where things *should* be.

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MUADIB
http://www.angelfire.com/retro/ssterile/MAIN%20PAGE.html
one small step for man,..... One giant leap for attorneys.
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On 1/31/2005 8:46 PM US(ET), MUADIB took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

Except where knowing first hand, where things are *allowed* to be, which a visit to the local building department.will determine. Between the time the original fence was built and the current time, setback codes may have changed. I know that 20 years ago, the fence setback in my area was 6" for a 6' foot high fence. It is now 3'. I have to get a permit to replace damaged portions of my fence, although I am grandfathered at 6"

-- Bill
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There is that isn't there?.................LOL
And another damn good added post !
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MUADIB
http://www.angelfire.com/retro/ssterile/MAIN%20PAGE.html
one small step for man,..... One giant leap for attorneys.
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Talk to your City Surveyor he will know the correct way and it is free.
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James Madison III wrote: ...

If you can find both rods, it should be pretty easy to run a line of sight line down the existing fence to the other rod to see if it is inside or on the line.
I've not read whole thread, but if nobody has mentioned it, since you mentioned going towards the street be sure you know what zoning rules (if any) apply or subdivision covenants.
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This seems strange to me. Why would the fence separating two properties not be built *on* the boundary, straddling it, with the owners of the adjacent properties sharing the cost? -- unless, as on one side of our property, there is a drainage easement, in which case, I assume, no fence could be built at all.
Perce
On 01/31/05 06:06 pm Heathcliff tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

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On 1/31/2005 10:18 PM US(ET), Percival P. Cassidy took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

If your fence is on the line, there is no place for you to fix, paint, or otherwise touch the outside of your fence without trespassing on your neighbor's property.

--
Bill

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I think it is a safety issue to avoid disputes later.
For one thing, I'm not willing to share the cost. I don't want a fence and it my neighbor does, it is on him 100%. If accidentally he strayed on my property with it I'd not be happy about it.
In some neighborhoods, you are correct and both may share the cost. The next problem is 20 years later when both have moved and new people reside there and the fence needs repairs. One says OK, the other says No.
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James Madison III wrote:

In my community, a side-yard fence may not extend beyond the back of the house (toward the street). You ought to check with the local building department.
Roby
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The fence on the opposite side of my house (my fence) extends 30 feet past the back of the house towards the street, also I see many other houses in my neighborhood have fences that extend past the back of the house so I guess I thought I was safe. I don't want to tear down though so I'll probably check the codes just in case.
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I had the original surveyor come out to do it. He used a metal detector, found the iron rods and staked them for $100. I could have done that. The cost of the survey is dependant on how far back the surveyor has to go to establish a reference. The original surveyor would know where the references are. More importantly is knowing your communities regulations. I couldnt extend my fence beyond the front of the house even though I could point to a dozen houses that had done so. But than I had gotten a permit and the others all eventually got letters asking them to demolish their fences. In addition the codes required the fence to be 6 inches inside the property line with the good side facing out.

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