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On 01/13/2016 11:25 PM, Don Y wrote:

That's the problem that I hope has been resolved with the new devices. I haven't found a good way to organize either by topic or a simple read/unread. There are a series of small dots that indicate how much you've read but they require carefukl attention to differentiate.

I particularly dislike the current trend to consider webinars 'documentation'. It's the lazy way out and my mind tends to wander when people ramble on.
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On 1/14/2016 8:33 AM, rbowman wrote:

Ideally, a set of tags associated with each file. But, *applying* and *examining* them then becomes difficult -- you need to have a tool designed expressly for that purpose.
SWMBO takes a LOT of photographs. The camera records lots of detail -- most of which is unimportant to the (amateur) photographer! (exposure, etc).
Periodically, she downloads the photos from her camera onto her computer. Then, tries to sort through them based on content.
One of the tools she uses builds a database of user-defined tags (keywords) that you manually associate with the photos. So, she can create tags: rocks, water, mammals, birds, atmosphere, etc. Then, if she's got a photo of some BIRDS chasing a COYOTE alongside a ROCKy RIVERbed at SUNSET, she can choose to apply ALL of those tags to that picture. Later, if she's looking for examples of "sunsets", she can search for photos tagged with "atmosphere" and find this photo -- along with umpteen gazillion others.
Great -- in theory. In practice, its almost impossible to use!
First, *you* have to come up with an appropriate set of keywords to cover *your* interests (makes sense; how would *I* know what is of interest to YOU?!). Then, you have to go through the tedium of applying them individually to the pictures (yeah, you can select multiple photos but, chances are, each photo will have a different SET of tags; so, select all that qualify as "sunsets" and ADD the "atmosphere" tag to those; then, deselect them and select all those with birds and add the bird tag to those; etc. And, later, when you realize your categories are too *broad* (e.g., originally you may have lumped "mammals" "reptiles" and "birds" into a single "wildlife" category and you later realize that these should have been spllit out into finer detail -- do you now go back through all the "mammal"-tagged objects and retag them with this new set??)
Or, you may realize there was a category that you hadn't initially considered and ALL of your existing photos need to be reexamined to determine if the category applies (if you *don't* do this, then the category has very limited practical value as it will be incomplete).
I had this problem when I originally lumped all my "programming languages" texts into a single directory -- which quickly became overly cluttered! "Hmmm.... maybe I should break things down by language?"

That's one of the reasons I don't watch youtube videos. They are all terribly amateurish.
*Organize* your thoughts before you present something. Then, *plan* how you will present it. And, afterwards, edit the result to best implement this vision! (would *you* want to watch what you've just created??)
There are lots of instructional DVD's covering art topics. One particularly good illustrator has a large series of "lectures/demos" he's prepared on different aspects of drawing human anatomy. But, the "productions" are terrible! They were apparently recorded sessions in classes he taught -- so there's lots of background noise (chairs being dragged across the floor, people coughing, crickets chirping, etc.). The microphone appears to have just been placed "somewhere convenient" -- instead of somewhere APPROPRIATE!
Camera angles are lousy -- you end up seeing *him* instead of the *work* he is preparing.
And, there's a fair bit of an investment (money and time to view!) in order to benefit from this... mess!
The same is true of many painting videos.
Given the sort of desktop audio/video editing capabilities available to damn near ANYONE, its silly that you can't shoot with multiple microphones and cameras and then mix the results appropriately in post. I.e., make a *professional* presentation instead of a cheap "hack".
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On 01/14/2016 11:31 AM, Don Y wrote:

I've never had a lot of interest in photography but when the digital cameras came out I started carrying one. I've got a great collection of mountain tops, waterfalls, canyons, alpine lakes, and so forth. I can identify about 20% of the locations. Geotagging would be nice but I'm too much of a Luddite.
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On 1/14/2016 8:58 PM, rbowman wrote:

I use a digital camera to save typing. Easier for me to snap a photo, shrink it to emailable size and send it as an attachment to a message than it would be to try to describe a lot of things. E.g., to illustrate how far from the house the water flowing *off* the roof falls as it SHOOTS past the edge of the roof. A numerical measurement wouldn't be anywhere near as impressive as seeing a sheet of water defying gravity as it moves *sideways* instead of *down*!
A friend once observed that I only take pictures of *things*, not *people*. My reply, "Of course! I *know* what these PEOPLE look like! And, if I were to describe them to you, I surely wouldn't fixate on their *appearance* but, rather, their relationship(s) to me, etc. How would I photograph *that*?"
When I undertake a car repair, I find the camera a great expedient to track which bolts came off of which mechanism, etc. Or, recording how cables were dressed.
Likewise when I repair someone's laptop (as each one seems to be different and filled with assorted bits of varying dimensions, etc.)

She's usually not interested in where/when a photo was taken. Rather, she's captured the "texture" of water running over a submerged rock. Or, a cloud pattern. Or, sky color. Or, what some particular creature looks like. I.e., something that she can use as a "model" for a drawing/painting without having to be *there*, again.
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On 01/14/2016 10:33 PM, Don Y wrote:

That does beat a crude sketch on the back of whatever I had laying around.

I don't do art so it's more about remembering the day. If I can remember where it was. Some I certainly can like Muir Rock at Kings Canyon or the goats I met on the trail at Mt. Aneas. Other times I've seen too many waterfalls and mountain vistas unless they're really memorable ones.
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On 1/14/2016 11:12 PM, rbowman wrote:

A neighbor gave me the idea of using a digital camera to document things. I'd never been much of a camera buff. But, once he brought the idea up and made me realize I never had to "develop" any film (i.e., ENDLESS PHOTOS!), it was like getting slapped in the head with a brick: d'uh!

I don't rely on photos to preserve "(personally) important things". I figure if they are important, I'll remember them. If not, then I won't!
E.g., I can distinctly remember watching a sea turtle lay eggs on the beach when I was ~5. Damn thing felt as big as *me*! How could I possibly forget a thing like that?
OTOH, I doubt I could remember 1/4 of the names of the kids in any of my grade school classes! <shrug> Haven't seen any of them in 30+ years so why would their names "stick"?
OToOH, I can remember the date of birth of my best friend from college and that's just as ancient!
Second bake is done. Yippee! Now I can get back to work...
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On 1/13/2016 2:17 PM, Don Y wrote:

<big snip>
First things first. . . ;)
<https://www.overdrive.com/ The OverDrive app is one of the top-rated eBook apps available for iOS, Android, Chromebook, Mac OS, Windows, and Windows Phone.
I suggest you go to YOUR library's site and see what they have to say about HOW you can read the type(s) of ebooks they offer.
Susan
--



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On 1/13/2016 5:56 PM, Susan Bugher wrote:

Virtually all devices are supported -- along with PC/Mac "computers". As she is NOT interested in reading on a computer (otherwise, any of the desktops, laptops, tablets or other "appliances" that we have would be acceptable options), this means getting a *device* that she can use to fill the role that a print *book* would have filled.
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On 2016-01-13 7:52 PM, Don Y wrote:

Kobo Aura H2O, waterproof, dustproof 6.8" backlit screen. I have read 18,000 pages last quarter alone. Coming up to it's first anniversay of when I purchased it it and love it.
This is my answer to replacing my paperback library since I have read them all to tatters :)
(Buy the case for it as well).
--


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On 1/13/2016 8:14 PM, Idlehands wrote:

How do ebook pages compare to print pages? E.g., can you provide a count for some (popular) title that I could contrast with a print version? And, does page count vary based on (chosen) font size?
For example, a recent read (for me) was _Snow Crash_ -- just under 500pp in an ~8x10" format.

I've kept about 4 xerox boxes of paperbacks -- those that I reread the most often or that have some other sentimental attachment. Or, that are hard to find in other forms or lose much of their appeal in non-paper forms (e.g., _Letters from the Earth_ -- <http://www.sacred-texts.com/aor/twain/letearth.htm ). Or, have quirky little illustrations that complement the "read".
A E van Vogt is my favorite science fiction author (I suspect I have every title that he's written -- even reissues under different titles!). When I encounter one of his titles at a used bookstore (increasingly rare), I simply buy it, reread it and donate it (if I've already got a better copy in storage). This allows me to reread without having to "wear" titles out.
(Having said that, some titles simply don't hold up to use; e.g., _The Yum Yum Book_ was printed on very "stiff" paper so the pages *break* off!)

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On 2016-01-14 8:07 AM, Don Y wrote:

No idea, it's just a stat provided by my Kobo, I just read, I don't worry about the comparisons.

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On 2016-01-14 6:18 PM, Idlehands wrote:

As well it was more of a demo that it has been a very dependable device.
--
When Stephen Hawking was asked his IQ he said:

"I have no idea. People who boast about their I.Q. are losers."
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On 01/14/2016 08:07 AM, Don Y wrote:

Yes, if you choose a larger or smaller font the page is reflowed. There is a percentage given but not a page count.
This is really apples and codfish since I don't have a book as small as the Kindle screen, but a Per Wahloo detective story in a English paperback has about 300 words on a full page. The paperback is 8x5 with a fairly dense text format. A Asa Larsson mystery (in German) on the Kindle has about 160 but the Kindle screen is 5x3.5. An English novel with a little more dialog to break up the page was 150.
I'm not sure it's a meaningful metric. The percentage is equivalent to looking at a paper book and gauging how far along you are. I believe the newer models try to predict how long it will take you to finish based on your reading rate.
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On 1/14/2016 8:31 PM, rbowman wrote:

Isn't it about the size of a "pocketbook"?

Wow! Are you sure about that size? Hell, that's barely larger than an INDEX CARD!

For me, the issue would be how often you were "flipping" pages. The typical 1.5 - 2" thick paperbacks that seem to be the norm, nowadays, take me about 1.5 - 2 minutes to read a verso and recto page before having to "flip". An ereader would halve that time just because it only shows recto pages.
But, if the pages are considerably smaller (due to screen size of lack of display resolution at "typical" typeface sizes), then it could be even faster!
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On 01/15/2016 04:58 AM, Don Y wrote:

That's what is affectionately known as a 6" screen. 4 7/8 high is a more accurate measurement. The Paperwhite is 300 ppi for 1440 x 1080, while the keyboard is 167 ppi for 600 x 800. I haven't seen a Paperwhite in the flesh so I don't know how much the higher resolution buys you.
The SONY Digital Paper DPT-S1 is A4 size with 1600 x 1200 resolution. It's also around $800 and I don't know if it does anything other than pdf's.
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On 1/15/2016 8:15 AM, rbowman wrote:

Sheesh! I think I have 10-15 year old PDAs with screens bigger than that!

I suspect that is probably overkill. IIRC, my tablet PC's are 1024x768 (?) at 12" (just as large as the "active" portion of most sheets of paper) and I rarely have to zoom to see additional detail.
As it's a PC, it's not limited to ereader functionality -- nor a specific set of ebook formats (having a single function device, nowadays, seems pretty crippling). E.g., I presently have one in it's "dock" connected to four external USB drives serving their contents to my "NAS-RAID" over SMB shares. A BT keyboard and BT mouse let me use it as a computer when not acting as a file service.
Take it out of the dock and it's back to being my ebook reader.
(Unfortunately, I only have *one* dock so other tablet sits in a small carrying case)
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On 01/15/2016 10:11 AM, Don Y wrote:

I've never noticed a limitation. My tablet's screen is and inch longer and 1/8 narrower for 7" diagonal. The problem you get into is the overall size. Back when we started to develop a tablet product I spec'ed out a couple of Acer 10" tablets for the programmers on the project. The selling point was the charger was a separate connection so you could leave it on the wall wart and use the USB port for the debugging interface.
After working with them, I walked across the street to BestBuy and bought an almost identical tablet but in the 7" form factor. I realize that if I was going to hump around a 10" tablet I might as well bring the 13" Win7 notebook with the real keyboard. I can slip a 7" tablet, or the almost identically sized Kindle into a cargo pocket.
Phones have been through the same thing. The postage stamp sized display is awkward, so they started to grow up to the phablet class with 5 to 7" screens.
It's all about being mobile and if you can't reasonably stick it in a pocket or purse it's a problem.
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On 1/15/2016 9:05 PM, rbowman wrote:

Neither of us is looking for "portable" more than "living room, bedroom, or office". We don't travel anymore. In the past, if I traveled, I'd pack a large "aircraft carrier" laptop (small displays and small keyboards are irritating). SWMBO would pack a *tiny* laptop in her travels to economize on space in her luggage (she would only use it to stay connected to her email).
When I reference stuff in my archive, the tablet PC just frees me from sitting at a "PC" (even laptops create the "desktop" style interface). Standardizing on PDF's means I can also reference those same documents when "working" at a desktop/laptop -- without having to deal with an assortment of formats.
When she's reading (leisure), the BOOK is in her lap on the couch, in bed, etc. When not actively reading, the "novel du jour" sits in a basket by the bed. She could conceivably store an ereader in that same space when not in use. Charging would require some other arrangement.
But, she's likely to get frustrated, at some point, with the experience. She was using a PDA (kept in her secretary) for addresses and calendar. But, grew frustrated with ActiveSync's flakey performance and opted to go back to paper and pencil.
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On 01/15/2016 11:01 PM, Don Y wrote:

The pile by my bed includes the Kindle along with paper books, both from the library and one's I've purchased.

My PDA is and always has been a spiral ring notebook small enough to slip in a shirt pocket. I don't have that many addresses to keep track of, or anything that passes for a calendar. At work I use the Thunderbird calendar which gives me an alert so I can disappear before tedious meetings.
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On 1/16/2016 1:13 PM, rbowman wrote:

Mine is lined with bookshelves (technical/reference literature). I don't borrow "books" from the library (just DVD's).

She liked the PDA when it worked reliably. But, when ActiveSync started throwing fits and she could no longer keep a backup on her laptop, she decided it wasn't worth the effort/risk.
I used to keep my address book on a PDA (not trusting an email client as email is, by definition, on an "accessible" machine!). But, as I moved away from snail mail and telephone contacts, the utility dwindled. Now, I have a backup of the PDA on one of my NetBSD boxes but, for the most part, don't fret the street addresses, birthdates, driving directions, etc. that are stored therein.
I've saved the PDA's, though, as they will eventually be used as little BT "terminals" (small touch screen, convenient to keep on a coffee table to interact with the automation system!). Silly to try to *build* something in that form factor, cost, etc.
I have one TINY cell phone (WiFi/BT) that I will carry, from time to time, to use as a portable terminal when interacting with diagnostic services on certain devices. Tiny display is more convenient than carrying a laptop for that purpose. (and, the diagnostic services aren't written expecting bountiful display resources! :>)
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