Er, Uh, Kinda important

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Hi!
I couldn't find alt.space.shuttle.repair, so I thought I'd come here.
Anyone have any ideas on how to fix a space shuttle? The gas gauge is broken, and the other day some of the stuff I had taped together came apart, and smashed a bunch of tile gizmos or something. (Whoo! that one sure pissed off my boss! Why that man is so sensitive about decorative tile I HAVE NO IDEA!)
Anyway, he wants to launch Sunday or something, and I'll be damned if I can get this gauge thing working. I've jiggled all the wires and connectors, and I'll be damned if that helped anything. At this point I'm thinking of taking out the gauge and just putting in a light that comes on when it runs out of gas. And just to make sure I don't have to work the weekend again, I think I'll put in a burnt out lamp.
Also, I was thinking maybe we could make some extra money around here by selling advertising space on the shuttle. I think a big BLACK CAT sticker would be much more appealing then those big NASA stickers anyway.
Thanks for any help/suggestions!
- Some technician at NASA
http://www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/247-07142005-514626.html
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I always thought those external tanks should be painted an ecru shade and made to look like condoms. You know, with a little floppy thing on the end.............
Steve
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I suggest adding a dipstick on a long string. Don Young

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Are you sure its the gauge? Maybe you are out of fuel. Happened with my lawnmower once. Pushed the primer bulb, pulled the cord and nothing. Before you start playing with the gauge, check to see the tank has fuel and be sure to push the primer bulb three times.
If that does not work, RTFM!!!
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And screw the cap off, and look into the LOX tank, and make sure it's full, too.
--

Christopher A. Young
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This guy might have a suggestion or two. :o). Maybe put a set of wings on this thing, and forgetta about the shuttle.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&itemE61280339
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This thing better come with a box of Depends!
holy cow!
Steve
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Have you tried tapping the glass on the gauge? Sometimes the altimeter needle sticks too, tapping it sets it free once again...
<snip>

SpaceCowboy
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Duh. I bet you got the positive and negative switched.
Steve
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all the parts you need at napa. You'll have it fixed by Sunday. Easy.
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Well, thanks everyone, but as it turns out we decided not to figure out why the gauge isn't working. Turns out it really isn't important after all.
But, we did decide that since there were three other working gauges, we should swap the wiring between the one that isn't working, and one that is, to help us troubleshoot the problem. I asked my boss if the result of this could be that we end up with 2 gauges that don't work - he told me 'shut up kid' and 'get with the program'.
Also, he told me: 'multiple failures would have to occur in multiple systems for the worst-case scenario to come true'. Also that: 'Bottom line is we've performed a lot of analysis and understanding and I think we're smarter in understanding exactly what we have on the condition and what we've got with our systems.'
So we have that going for us, which is nice.....
Also, we found some things called 'ground problems' and got rid of them. I guess they didn't have anything to do with the original problem, and no one knew about them. I asked my boss if he was kinda embarrased to find major problems that no one noticed before, while trying to fix a problem that no one understands - he said: 'Shut up, kid, get with the program'.
Oh well, I'm just a lowly technician somewhere in NASA. See ya all at the launch asplosion!!
Oh - Boss said to delete all our email, and shred any that has been printed. I dunno whats up with that.
Any ideas?
http://apnews.myway.com/article/20050725/D8BIJ8400.html
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Matt, 7/25/2005, 5:09:11 PM,

I work at NASA also and know how to fix this problem. We don't bother trying to repair it, we just custom build a new one and spend years convincing Quality Assurance people it is safe and sound. The reason your boss tells you "to get with the program" is that you are drinking too much and should check out the Alcoholics Anonymous program.
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Seve Ballesteros describing his four-putt at Augusta\'s No. 16 in 1988.
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Greetings,
As I understand it there are four sensors. They should just fly the shuttle with three working until they can fix the fourth (which they should work very hard on.) The space shuttle is entirely safe if we keep finding reasons never to fly. We will get more missions out of the space shuttles before retirement if we take additional risks and fly more missions than if we are so careful not to let one blow up that we fly very very few missions. More spineless American syndrome if you ask me. America is trying very hard to throw away the edge we have in space technology (a very important field long term).
Just my 2 cents, William
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:
<snipped it all>

Not even worth that...
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On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 15:59:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

You think so? Would you like to be on it, or a family member of yours be on it, with a faulty safety system? Do you even understand what these four sensors actually *DO* ?

Are you speaking from the perspective of a highly educated aerospace engineer, or simply blathering like an idiot with a 3rd grade education? How could you possibly know how safe the shuttle is? You know nothing.

Nobody asked you, and your opinion is clearly worthless, you ignorant doofus.

You think so, huh? Who is challenging America in the "space race"? Russia? France? LOL! Who?
--
If you\'re not on the edge, you\'re taking up too much space.
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Dan C wrote:

I would have been happy to be an Astronaut. I understand that there is risk associated with it. There is risk associated with being a spy, or the president, or in the military, or any number of professions. For many, the risk is worth it. If you don't think so you can sit at home and watch it on TV while eating potato chips.

My understanding is that they prevent the space shuttle from running out of fuel by shutting down the engines before that happens. If the space shuttle runs out of fuel it could blow up.

How do I know how safe the shuttle is? Simple, the shuttle has a long history. Look at the percent of missions which result in disaster and the shuttle is roughly that safe. It is a little more dangerous now because the fleet has aged but it is also a little less dangerous because we just spend 2.5 years overhauling the fleet. I last saw the space shuttle in Florida March 9th, 2005 at which point I heard the number of 3-4% chance of failure per mission. The truth is no one knows exactly.

It is your opinion that my opinion is clearly worthless. I am an "ignorant doofus?" Come on, give me a break.

China. China is challenging us. They are not challenging us in where they are at. They are challenging us in their rate of advance. There is currently no reason to believe they won't eventually surpass us (even though they are Communist and we are a Democracy).

PS: You aren't one of those Linux users who thinks all non Linux users are an "ignorant doofus" are you?
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

It's easy to tell you're certainly one of them...
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On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 16:50:09 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:


Almost. Close enough for the sake of this conversation. But.... What do you think happens if the engines shut down before the shuttle has reached a high enough altitude to break free of gravity and remain in space? The problem which occurred last week was that the sensor indicated the tank was empty (when it really wasn't), and therefore would have shut down the engines. Guess what happens next...

That is a VERY over-simplified view of things. The reality of it is that you DO NOT launch if there are things which you KNOW are problems. That way if things go wrong it is only because of things you did not know about beforehand. The real name of this process is: "Operational Risk Management" (ORM). It's how things are done.


Wrong again. China is not currently anywhere near our level. The real point here is that there is not really a "space race" any more. What are they going to do, go to the moon?


Absolutely not.
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Dan C wrote:

Try as you'd like, you cannot educate an idiot who thinks he knows everything.
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wrote:

So quit trying. Yer not going to educate him or change his mind in the short time you have to work on him.
Steve
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