Epoxy for metals

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I have never found Gorilla glue to be that great. I did a controlled test on softwood and hardwood bonding (3 combinations) and regular old yellow carpenter glue beat it.
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On 12/13/2015 6:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The old carpenter glue is better for gluing wood and polyurethanes don't hold up as well for long term use.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com posted for all of us...

+1 on that. I used GG on an unstressed piece of wood and after about a year it failed. Reg carpenters glue never did.
--
Tekkie

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On 12/13/2015 8:17 AM, Don Y wrote:

Might mention that my comments on long term stability of epoxies are based on the pure ingredients which generally are the epoxy bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and an aliphatic amine or poly amide curing agent. This is the stuff I have stored in my basement that is 40 years old and still looks good.
Materials such as J-B weld contain fillers like calcium carbonate, talc and metal powder along with some solvents.
These could change stability and lead to shorter lifetime of the ingredients. For example, the solvent could evaporate and make the mass tough to work with.
Same type comments would hold for the fast curing epoxy which would contain a catalyst that might lower long term stability.
So it is hard to judge the storability of epoxies under these circumstances.
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On Sun, 13 Dec 2015 06:17:41 -0700, Don Y

Absolutely.
PC-7 and PC-11 are great. And there's no need to buy a new PC, only the glue.
I would buy it in a pair of 4oz. cans. Ace Hardware has that size iirc. If you use separate popsicle sticks or separate screwdrivers for each can, and never let any of one touch the other, I've gone 20 years on the same 8 ounces and the unused stuff looks like new. ( Most of my repairs are small. I haven't been doing as much gluing in the last 10 years (plus I also use 5-minute epoxy in the syringe.)
I'm not sure of the difference except the first is dark grey and the second is white. I think the second was labeled for marine use, but the first is water-resistant I think, also. Still, they must know something. So if you need to glue a marine, use PC-11.
PC-7 " Two-part multipurpose epoxy adhesive paste works as a bonding agent, sealant, and filler for a range of indoor and outdoor applications Bonds many materials, including fiberglass, wood, concrete, many metals, brick, glass, ceramic, and rubber Seals oil, gas, and water tank leaks, as well as plumbing and masonry cracks Fills holes, castings, and molds Application temperature range is 35 to 115 degrees F, and service temperature range is -20 to +200 degrees F PC-7 formulation provides extended working time, for large and critical jobs, which allow the user to reposition work or make changes. High "wet grab" or tack of PC-7 Paste Epoxy makes overhead and sidewall work easy, without drip or sag. [it sagged for me, but if I'd waited 2 more minutes before I put it on, it wouldn't have. Better to put it on early and keep pushing it back where it should go.] Note: PC-7 will not bond to wax paper, Teflon, Polyethylene and some other plastics. Test a small area when in doubt."
PC-11 " Two-part marine epoxy adhesive paste bonds materials in dry, wet, and underwater environments. Bonds many materials, including fiberglass, concrete, many metals, glass, ceramic, and rubber Can be used in indoor and outdoor applications, with a temperature range of 35 to 115 degrees F and a service temperature range -20 to +200 degrees F High-tack paste can be used in vertical and overhead applications Resists mild acids, caustics, detergents, gasoline, fuel oil, and fresh and salt water"
They are not as drippy as JBWeld, and can be smoothed with a wet finger. (Tastes terrible. Use the next finger.)
It sticks to glass, aiui.
My first occasion to use one was a dripping drain pipe below a dripping faucet. I didn't feel like fixing everything so I only did what was essential, the drain, and even though it was dripping water while I worked on it, PC-7 still hardened and was waterproof. Incredible. It takes about 5 minutes to harden, and it would droop while i was waiting, so I'd push it back up, and eventually it hardeded while it was up, in good contact with much of the pipel
In another case, I was missing the cap for a wine sack. I coated the threads with vaseline and molded a cap from PC-7. When it hardened, I drilled a hole for a string to tie it to the wine sack. I'll admit I never use the thing, but it's still good 40 years later.
Another time I had a commercial grade food mixer, and the teeth were damaged from one fiber gear. 5 were missing. I put a lump of PC-7 on the area and when it dried, I carved teeth in it. It only ran for a minute, before one or more teeth broke, but I think that's pretty good Little teeth under a lot of pressure, even the originals broke.
I also patched a sauce pan, and then forgot and boiled all the water out of it. It still didn't leak.
(Amazon.com product link shortened) has six different sizes.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)50057712&sr=1-1&keywords=pc-11 seven sizes. including one ounce.
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wrote:

That's because the products were invented before personal computers were.
http://www.pcepoxy.com/our-products/paste-epoxies/pc-7.php
Despite what it says, it cleans up with water.
Directions: Using separate knives to remove amount needed, mix equal parts A (grey) and B (black) on flat clean surface until uniform color is
[I use some glossy cardboard like a cereal box. I don't know why I want glossy, considering I throw it away.]
achieved. Surfaces to be bonded must be free of dirt, oil, rust, etc. For best results, rough up the surface PC-7® will be bonding to. [I've not had to do this] Normally, no vice or clamp needed. Prop or tape heavy objects to a wall or ceiling.
Apply PC-7® Epoxy Paste in any thickness to both sides of surface and bring together firmly. Be careful to insure that ample amount of PC-7® remains between the contact surfaces. Use screen wire or fiberglass cloth to reinforce large voids and gaps.
Denatured alcohol is excellent for smoothing applied PC-7®. Also use Denatured alcohol to clean surfaces before applying.
After cure: Paint, Drill, Machine, Sand, File, Tap, or Saw.
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On Sunday, December 13, 2015 at 5:17:32 AM UTC-8, Don Y wrote:

It's fairly cheap. Just buy another unit. (had a pair of tubes for several years now)
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