Epoxy coating a round log

Hi...any tips on applying epoxy to a round log? I do not need the entire log coated as I am not worried about the underside.
Do I just lay the log on some plastic, pour the epoxy over it and let gravity do its work?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That would work. If the bark is rough you'll probably have to brush the epoxy around to get all nooks and crannies covered. Not much will remain on the sides, either, because of gravity, so you might want to use Cab-O-Sil to thicken the epoxy.
You do know, I hope, that epoxy spits out amines on the surface as it cures which need to be cleaned off and that the epoxy deteriorates rather quickly in sunlight or other UV?
One last comment - if that log is any size, you'll need a bank loan to cover it with epoxy.
--

dadiOH
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I am in the epoxy business. What exactly are you trying to do? - paul
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The log is about 5 foot long and is only about 6 inches in diameter. I actually split the log in half last night. It's for a bar as an arm rest. It can now sit nice and flat and all I need is a smooth, hard finish over the log. What's my best option?
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On Mar 25, 10:35 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Polyester boat resin in a plastic film lined box is still your best and easiest process. The lower resin viscosity will penetrate wood fiber better than solvent diluted reactive resin systems. UV resistance is a plus. What ever system you choose, read the labels and know in advance what the hazards are in working with them. Amine type hardeners in epoxies, for example, may cause dermatitis in some people. Never had that problem myself, but have seen it in the workplace. Good luck.
Joe
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Thanks, Joe. Any particular type of Polyester boat resin? I called one of my local boat supply stores and was told they have several types available.
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Thanks, Joe. Any articular type of Polyester Resin? I called my local boating supply store and was told they have several different types.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'm with Joe as far as epoxy or polyester goes.
As far as "smooth" goes, how rough is it now? Bark on or off? If on, heavy and serrated or pretty smooth? It would help to know what species it is.
Assuming you only want to coat the now flat surface...
1. cover some thin strips of wood with plastic tape on one side
2. tack the strips - plastic side in - to your log so that they extend a bit above it
3. pour polyester CASTING resin onto the surface
4. after the resin cures, remove the wood strips and clean up drips on sides. You could minimize drips by sticking some modeling clay in voids between the the log and strips of wood making up the dam. __________________
If you want to coat more than the flat surface, one way you could do it regardless of current smoothness is to sort of cast it by building a trough affair of heavy but bendable mylar, suspending the log so there is maybe 1/8" between it and the mylar then filling the trough with catalyzed rein. You could also make a trough by splitting a cardboard cylinder and lining it with polyethylene plastic (plastic drop cloths are polyethylene). The plastic should peel off easily once cured.
Either way would be a PITA.
NOTE: polyester resin heats up as it cures. The faster it sets (more catalyst) the more heat.
Decent source for resins... http://www.uscomposites.com/polyesters.html
--

dadiOH
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The bark is off, the log is dry, and has been made pretty smooth. Tree type is White Birch.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Well, if it were me, I'd do the step by step in my previous post. However, if you want to cover all the wood - not just the flat surface - I'd do the non-flat part first. I'd just brush on laminating resin* til I had it all covered, then brush on a coat of the same with wax added, then use casting resin per my previous post for the flat part.
* Laminating resin stays sticky so that additional coats bond well. For it to cure completely, the surface needs to be protected from air; adding wax (to make "finishing" resin) keeps it away from air but the cured resin won't be shiny unless sanded and buffed. See the link in my previous post for supplies & more info.
--

dadiOH
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On Wed, 25 Mar 2009 08:35:47 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That doesn't sound that heavy. I would still try to turn it as the epoxy cures. Try to find the center of gravity and drive some big spikes in there Support it and turn it with a rotisserie motor. Pour the epoxy on and let it turn.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The others are right- epoxy is the wrong material for the job. They sell a plastic resin for applications like this. Any large hobby/craft/art supply shop should have it. (although it would probably be cheaper online or at an industrial supply.) A bar I used to hang out in had a layer of resin on the bar top covering a layer of coins, small bills, car keys, and similar trash. Yes, it made it hard to find your change.
-- aem sends...
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Is this a log with bark, or cleaned off? From my days of refinishing pianos, I learned that you can build a thick finish with shellac and then use varnish as a protective coat. Shellac isn't water/alcohol-proof. If you are going to pour the finish on, fashion a prop - nails stuck through scrap wood? - so the log isn't resting on a surface.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

--------------------
set it on some plastic or wax paper then just 'brush/pour' on some ,marine epoxy which is about honey thick over it.... Then perhaps a coat or three of varnish - paul/progressive epoxy polymers
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On Mar 23, 10:33 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

For lower cost, UV resistance and general easier application, a polyester boat resin or similar would be my choice. Use a very slow cure hardener to allow for a fairly long soak time and subsequent draining. Some 6 mil plastic in a wood box could be a suitable container.
Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I hope someone tells you how and you post the results back here.
In case I or anyone else ever needs an epoxy covered log.
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On Mon, 23 Mar 2009 08:33:29 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How big is the "log"? The best way is to turn it as the epoxy cures but if this is really a log making the spindle might be a trick.
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