entry door

The front door to my home is steel and is rusting at the bottom. someone suggested fixing a brass plate to the inside and outside of the door, at the bottom. That is an economical solution but I'm not sure it's the right thing to do. It's rusting from the inside out which means that any insulation inside the door is probably wet. Wouldn't that reduce it's insulating effect? I am thinking I ought to replace the door in the spring with a fiberglass one. What do you guys think?
Thanks, Bonnie in NJ
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BonnieJean wrote:

If applicable, I would try to disassemble the door a bit by removing the steel from the internal core of the door, probably wood. Then varnish the wood thoroughly or seal it with wax or liquid plastic. derust and polish the steel and varnish it, too. Then the door should be as bullet-proof as before and looks definetively more amiable and individualistic than 08/15 bog-standard plastics-door (made in far east(tm))
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the
thing
not, any attempt at repair would likely just postpone the inevitable. Dave
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the
thing
If it's just a bit of surface rust, a good sanding, priming, & painting will get you through a few more years. You'll have to be the judge of whether or not it's that bad. Even if you want to cover it up with a brass plate (see below), you shoul prime & paint it first.
As for the brass plate, it's not as simple as just screwing it on. Because brass and steel are different metals, you will need to electrically isolate them from each other. That means plastic inserts for the screws, plastic washers, and a plastic backing sheet if necessary to avoid any metal-to-metal contact. If the two metals are allowed to stay in contact, there is what is called a "dielectric effect". In essence, the two metals become a battery when moisture is present (and moisture is always present). This will inevitably accelerate the corrosion. I wouldn't do it.
Joe F.
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I would replace the door, but not necessarily with fiberglass. Steel would be fine as long as water isn't running onto the door, in which case you have to stop the wetness problem anyway. -B

the
thing
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Thanks for everyone's input. Well, water gets all over the door when it rains and it does appear to be rusting from the inside out, at the bottom 10 inches. I thought maybe condensation formed from extreme temperatures inside/outside in summer and winter, and the rust started that way. As it looks like I will replace it in the spring, what are your opinions on another steel door vs. a fiberglass one. I live only a few miles from the ocean. I'm not sure how salty the air is but maybe that has something to do with the rust too.
Bonnie in NJ

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The foam that they use in doors may or may not absorb much moisture. I don't understand what you mean by the door rusting from the inside out? The steel doors I've seen have foam insulation in them and steel outer shells.
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