Enlarging a hole for a deadbolt

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OK, wizards - here's a situation I can't find a good solution to. I have a Yale deadbolt in my back door, and want to replace with a KwikSet. The backset (from edge of door to center of hole) is correct for Kwikset, but the hole's size is too small. It's about 1-3/4", and the Kwikset requires 2-1/8". I've got the right size hole saw, but without solid wood for the guide bit, I can't see a way for the saw to work correctly. Using a saber saw is a possibility, I guess, but I wonder if there's something more elegant, as opposed to turning this into a cob job.
Anyone got a cool trick?
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Doug Kanter wrote:

hole saw that can reach the bottom of the existing hole to center it.
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Huh? My hole saws hae center guide bits, but if there's no wood for them to drill, how can they center the hole saw?
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Fill the hole with wood putty, let it set up and redrill with correct size hole saw Chuck

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That's a lot of putty. Could take several applications, and a week or more for all of it to set up. Now I'm wondering about screwing a piece of scrap wood to one side of the door and using that as a target for the guide bit.

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Yep.
-chib
--
(email: change out to in)

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Might work -- but a lot of extra work.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

saw. Clamp scrap into position over where you want bigger hole. Drill hole.
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Use a 1-3/4" hole saw as guide and piggy back a 2-1/8" hole saw on top. This trick I read it on a magazine this month.

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Ooh! I like that better than plugging the existing hole!
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Attach them both to the same arbor?

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Doug Kanter wrote:

I must have seen it, too, but just can't remember where. Both attached to the same arbor, reminded me of an upsidedown wedding cake.
Josie
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Will wrote:

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willshak wrote:

Got a router? Got a 3/8 cutter with a 1/4 shank? Extend the bit so it cuts the underside of the hole about 1/2 the thickness of the wood. Use the shank of the bit to run around the top edge of the hole. You have now enlarged the diameter of the bottom half of the hole by 1/8. Turn the door over, set the bit so it cuts what wasn't cut before. Repeat until the enlarged part of the hole is the correct diameter then switch to a 1/4 bit and trim the rest of the hole flush with the enlarged part.
Takes more time to tell than do, makes a nice vertical hole.
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Yet ANOTHER good idea! I don't think about my router at times like this because frankly, I'm not that skilled with it. Out comes the scrap wood for practice purposes.......
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2) Take a square scrap of wood. Draw a 1-3/4" circle with a compass. Make a pilot hole at the center. Line up the circle with the old door hole. Clamp the scrap in place. Drill the new hole using the scrap as your guide.
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Bore the correct hole in a scrap of ply, clamp this where you want the hole and bore away. The scrap will guide the outside of the holesaw. For the best results, bore the skin from both faces in.

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Eric Ryder said...

was dead easy.
--
Stiky

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I've also used this method with success. Make a little jig from scrap ply with a stop for correct backset, bore hole in it, and clamp to door. If you're like me, layout a horizontal center on door edge and jig so you can align both sides of the door accurately. AND remember, most lock sets allow some margin of error. You're lucky if you won't have to fool with filling the old lock mortise in. I spent 3 hrs last weekend retrofitting a Schlage unit to a mortised skeleton key setup. It was funny... Prepping the stock, fitting, and gluing up the mortise was easy, but matching the small unfinished areas of a 100 year old oak door took the majority of my time.
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[snip]

I found the article, just a snippet, really - "The Family Handyman" October 2004. pp 19. It syas to use two hole saws, the pilot saw the same diameter os the existing hole and the larger hole saw (the correct size) - install both. Go slowly until the pilot saw aligns the larger.
Looks soooo easy,
Josie
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