Engineered hardwood flooring questions

I am going to be installing ~1400 sq ft of 3/4" x 4 1/2" engineered plank oak hardwood flooring. I am going with the 3/4" stuff because it has a fairly thick wear layer, so that it can be refinished several times. I haven't bought the stuff yet, but I have been reading. The installation will be over 3/4" T&G plywood for most rooms and ~300 sq ft will go over a below grade (4' below) concrete floor. The concrete floor has never exhibited any moisture problems.
I am interested in comments and hints from those who have used 3/4" prefinished engineered wood, particularly from either Capella or Muskoka/Tembec. I would also like to know if there were any quality problems with these two companies, if you used their products . (I can't find much pro or con discussion on the net.)
Since I expect that I will be doing the job over several months, I intend to buy rather than rent a pneumatic floor nailer (PortaNailer) to nail the planks to the T&G. According to both manufacturers, this is acceptable with this thickness.
Several questions: How well does the engineered stuff nail? If you have used Capella or Muskoka, how was the material? Was there a lot of bad pieces? Was the grade what you expected? How well has it held up to traffic?
I don't feel like laying down underlayment on the concrete and then nailing the planks down. This will raise the floor by 1 1/2". I think I will be gluing down the planks directly to the concrete. If I have to nail to underlayment, I think I would go with the floating underlayment method which lays down two staggered layers of 3/8" sheets nailed or screwed together, and nail or glue to this. Anyone tried this? It does not seem to be a very common method.
Anybody glued down on concrete using the 3/4" planks? How bad was it? What did you do to make sure boards were tight fit?
Roughly how long can I expect it to take me to complete a good sized room. I am reasonable handy, and I have most of the appropriate power tools; I do intend to buy a miter saw to supplement my table saw.
Any other hints I can use to make the job go easier?
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On Wed, 21 Nov 2007 16:52:15 -0600, Gary Dyrkacz.

What does "engineered" mean? Is that where they take a bunch of saw dust, compress it with some kind of glue mixed in, then add a 0.5mm oak laminate on one side?
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Mine is more like plywood with a 1/16" ply on top.
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wrote:

There are variations, but it appears where we are talking about moderate quality products or better, engineered planks are based on multiple wood plys, anywhere from 3 to 7. The examples I mentioned are 5 ply. The wear layer in these specific cases is either 1/8" or 1/6".
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What does the manufacturer recommend? Below grade, most want a barrier of some sort. In my case, it was just a poly sheeting. It does not matter what you do or do not feel like doing, it is what is needed to perform properly over the next 20 years or more. Trying to save $100 and an hour now can be a foolish error.

I've not done it, but I understand it is fairly easy at or above grade. Check what the manufacturer says below grade. Actually, they say not to install it below grade and remember, the warranty will be void on that portion. Q - Where can hardwood floors be installed? A - Muskoka hardwood floors can be installed pretty well anywhere in your home. " solid products from the Muskoka Gallery Collection can be installed on or above grade. Engineered products from the Muskoka Architectural Collection can be installed below, on, or above grade. All Muskoka products should avoid being installed in any bathrooms and/or wet bar areas.

Be sure the miter saw has a decent carbide blade.
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<SNIP>

(vapor) under it. There is a natural flow of water vapor that passes through the cement and to put a barrier between it and room gives the potential for it to condense under the poly sheeting. MLD
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