energy loss through recessed lighting


Read that these recessed can lights are horrible in terms of letting heat and ac up through the ceiling. Are there reasonably priced retrofit kits that will insulate these?
thanks all
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Many recessed lighting companies have "air tight" trims for this purpose, however they only work with certain housing kits. You need to find out what's in the ceiling to determine what's available

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Chris Carruth wrote:

You need a fixture that is designed for the job. You can't retrofit a fixture that is not designed for it as that would create an unsafe situation and possible fire hazard.
Chances are you will need to replace the existing fixtures.
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Joseph Meehan

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I've heard about this issue as well... where does the air escape from? Are their holes in the fixture or around where the fixture meets the drywall?
I'm curious if I should get the airtight units myself, as I need IC type remodel fixtures.
Also, what kinda bulbs do you use in these things? I'm planning on putting 16 in my 40x20ft living room in this pattern
____________________________________ | x x x x | | x x | | x x | | x x | | x x | | x x x x | --------------------------------------------------------------
could I get the wattages low enough to keep from sunbathing in my living room?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Well you could use a dimmer with conventional lamps or use low wattage CF's (Compact Florescent) and maybe wire them so every other lamp is on a circuit A & B with separate switches. If you really wanted to do it right, I would suggest home run wiring to the switch point so you can adjust the lighting control as the use of the room changes. You may want to be able to dim or shut off one wall for example if you are using it as a home theater or brighten one wall if you want to emphasis some art work on that wall.
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Joseph Meehan

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Most recessed fixtures have holes or slots inside the baffle. If you need/want to run insulation over the fixtures, you need IC frames and if you don't want air from below to escape through the fixtures, you need air-tight fixtures. Typically when IC and air-tight are required, you are very limited in wattages, which are usually pretty low

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Chris Carruth wrote:

In a retrofit installation of recessed light cans below an accessible attic with insulation, would building an airtight enclosure between the joists using plywood or drywall be a good idea?
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