Enamel Paint For Cowboy Coffee Pot.

I picked up this Cowboy Coffee Percolator on eBay.
http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/s0IAAOSwuAVW07dm/s-l1600.jpg
There is some rust on the inside bottom from where the steel percolator basket as apparently worn down the enamel coating. I've tried vinegar, wet-dry sandpaper, etc. but the rust is being very stubborn. I don't want to go at it too hard for fear of removing even more enamel.
A little rust in my coffee isn't going to hurt me, correct? This is not going to be an everyday pot, it's just for weekend camping trips several times a year. From what I read about using slightly rusted bake-ware, rust can harbor bacteria in the "crevices", but if it can be washed prior to use, that should not be an issue. (I'm not talking about scaling rust in the pot, just some surface rust.)
I found some some food-safe enamel paint, but it's temperature range only goes to 200°.
http://www.piwine.com/gondola-enamel-black-500cc.html
Specs emailed from their customer service department:
-20° F if surface is not flexible and up to 200° F.
Even though the ideal water temp for coffee is between 195° and 200? ?, that is very hard to control in a percolator. Food safe or not, I don't want melted paint in my coffee.
Just looking for some ideas, other than "Throw the pot way" or "Let SWMBO use it as a planter." ;-)
A little bit of coffee flavored rust won't hurt me, right?
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On Thursday, June 2, 2016 at 1:42:50 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

...you included the best advice possible! Rust will raise and crack the rest of the glaze.
http://tinyurl.com/hyk5pvx
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Right.
You do realize, don't you, that what is on your pot isn't paint, it is enamel; i.e., fused glass aka porcelain
The rust in your pot is either from the basket or the enamel has been breached and the steel under it is rusting. If the later, it will continue despite anything you can realistically do and eventually the porcelain will begin to flake off..
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On Thursday, June 2, 2016 at 4:20:45 PM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

0°,

Yes, I know it's not paint. My inclusion of the link to the enamel paint was only because I was looking for a food-safe, hard finish that might be able to withstand the rugged environment at the bottom of a percolator.
I am open to other suggestions.

ue

ll

Thus the desire to recoat the bottom.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

The problem is, if recoated the steel will continue to rust UNDER whatever you put on it. Other than porcelain, the only things I can think of that might give you a shot at recoating are aluminum and zinc (OK, I can think of others but you wouldn;t want lead and low temp metals like babbit wouldn't do you any good. Both will melt at temperatures easily attainable on a gas stove or via propane torch, I have no idea how well they would bond with the existing enamel.
Maybe glass? Chip away the enamel in the bad spot so you can remove the rust, spot heat the area and a piece of glass rod, smear the softened glass around, Wouldn't be neat.
Really, more trouble than it is worth.
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On Thu, 2 Jun 2016 11:42:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

It's good for you. Keeps your iron level up - needed for Hemoglobin production. And it's "cofee colored" as well.
If you are thinking that you will be able to re-enamel your pot or cooker then simply it isn’t possible - or at leasat generally not feasible. The application of vitreous enamel requires specialist equipment and must be fused at a temperature above 750 degrees Centigrade. (1382F) Normal ‘industrial’ size industrial enamelling is thus outside the scope of home application. However, if you wish to try your hand at some DIY enamelling for copper jewellery there are some very simple kits available from craft shops
If you can get your hands on a bit of jewelers enamel and flux you could TRY heating the pot to 1380F in a kiln to re-fuse the ceramic. The big problem is all of the glaze would possibly melt at the same time and flow off. If you could get an enamel that fuses at 1350 or 1370 you MIGHT getb away with it (or it might crack as it solidifies)
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wrote:

r

,

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Would something like this be of any use? http://stovepaint.com/Products/AT/ViewType/PTID/1
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On Thursday, June 2, 2016 at 9:46:58 PM UTC-4, Dean Hoffman wrote:

0°,

I'll look into that. Thanks
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Derby-
You are trying to solve the wrong problem, and sanding the inside is not helping. It is highly unlikely that the porcelain has cracked on the inside, especially if there is no visible damage on the outside.
The rusty coloring you see is coming from the bottom of the steel insert. If it bothers you, you may be able to remove it with something like "CLR". But it will just come back over time. Personally, I would ignore it.
What if you found another similar pot with aluminum inserts that would fit yours? Take measurements and go look in thrift shops for aluminum pots!
Fred
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