Elmer's Ultimate Polyurethane Glue versus Ultimate Good-Performance Glue.

Do you know the difference between Elmer's Ultimate Polyurethane Glue, and Elmers Ultimate Good-Performance Glue.
Someone on the web recommended the first for a very difficult job -- gluing the same broken part on the same device that I have -- gluing a broken white plastic (or nylon?) gear to a metal shaft, and while google finds it, by the time one gets to many outlets that seem to sell it, the name has changed to the latter name!
==Alternatively, what you use to glue a a broken white plastic (or nylon?) gear to a metal shaft? The gear is in two pieces, and when I put half of it in place, and rotate the shaft it's a tight fit between it and each of the gears it mates with.
The part numbers are the same, the names are similar, but significant things are different.
No mention of polyurethane in the second one.
No mention of plastic. They say it glues metal, stone, wood and more, but nowhere says what the more is. I've never seen a glue that doesn't list either what it's good for or what it's not good for.
And they have not much, but more information on the new package than on the webpage. I had to go to the store in the snow only to find out a little more about it but still not much.
They have no information about the old product on the webpage, no reference to it, not even text documents from the Search box.
Also, interestingly, the instructions say if the materials aren't porous to dampen one side, but didn't say with what! :)
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mm wrote:

Polyurethane glue isn't what you want. ___________________

About the only things that *might* work are epoxy or cyanoacrylate ("super glue"). If it were me, I'd try a bit of epoxy on the side of the gear to see how well it sticks. Once cured - at least 24 hours - try removing it. If well stuck, use it to mend...I'd mix a thickener into the epoxy and slightly bevel all edges of the broken areas so the thickened epoxy has more area to grab.
If the test epoxy did not work, try the cyanoacrylate. If it doesn;t work, get a new gear. _________________

http://www.thistothat.com / __________________
Take a guess. Did you guess water? BINGO! Polyurethane glue needs water to cure.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

That's a very good idea.
I can try that, but I've never gotten anything to stick with "super glue", not even my fingers.

Like cornstarch? That's the only thickener I know, but I think it's for gravy. Seriously, what would you use as a thickener?

A good name. I might actually remember it. But "There are so many kinds of plastic its hard to give advice here that applies to them all. If possible try a small test in an area that doesn't show. "

I was also going to try mushroom soup.
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mm wrote:

Fumed silica (Cab-o-Sil), micro balloons, wood powder, etc. http://www.uscomposites.com/fillers.html
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

Thanks.
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Lots of luck with that one. Gluing nylon to steel...? The repair material you need can be located in your wallet - as long as you have enough for a new gear.
R
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Brittle glues are not good for many things, because they snap or break. Something slightly flexible like PL Premium is going to work better. I also use Plumbers Goop, but takes a few days to cure.
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Also, Elmers white glue is a more brittle glue. There exists the more flexable type. Its either Homopolymer or Copolymer
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wrote:

Elmer's Search found nothing for either word.
' Thanks to you and everyone for all the suggestions.
I haven't had ttime to rry anything yet, but I will.
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The definition of 'damp' implies water. If something else were required it would say so.
Joe
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people don't realize the stress gears take,that's why glue doesn't work for them.
--
Jim Yanik
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mm wrote:

No glue will hold well enough for nylon, especially on gears. The only repair that will work is melting the broken pieces together, such as with a woodburning iron or soldering iron (nonstick Teflon woodburning tip is better) and identical nylon as a filler. I've never fixed big or high-torque gears this way, only tiny ones, such as those in ancient TV tuners (and I still have one of those TVs but haven't rotated the tuner in a couple of years).
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On Thu, 13 Jan 2011 15:08:33 -0800 (PST), "larry moe 'n curly"

YOu know, I thought about that, but the guy on the web glued exactly this part from exactly this device (a computer printer) and he said it worked. Of course I don't know how long ago he had done it, and it might have broken the day after he posted.
I haven't had time to do any of the suggestions yet.

Better not. :-)
Thanks.
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On Thu, 13 Jan 2011 06:05:19 -0800, Smitty Two

Wow, I had no idea there would be such an organized list of gears.
I'll see if I can find the one I need.
Just a few days ago, the gear on my 12v tire pump broke also, and maybe they have one for that too.
I later got another pump for free somewhere, but now that I need it, it's not where it used to be. Still, knowing I have it means I don't want to buy a third pump.
Maybe I can find both gears. The pump worked wquite well for at least 10 years. The first thing I asked about, a computer printer, I got broken and don't really need, although it's an all in one, very light, the flatbed scanner definitely works well, and the software is pretty darn good.** The printer has separate buttons for color copy, b&w copy, scan to computer, scan to fax, and scan/insert in email. A nice design. **Some of the software will probably work with any scanner or printer.
I save gears from things that break, but I don't have either of these.)
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