electronic wall timer

Ok I want to wire in a electronic wall timer that says it can be wired into a 3 way switch. I will read the instructions again but in case it doesn't answer this, does it matter if the timer is wired to the closest 3 way switch to the electric circuit panel or the farthest one? In either case, if a person used the other 3 way switch to turn on or off the light, would that affect the timer if it's already set for a later time?
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I would think it's not going to matter. In either case the switch has one wire that has power on it all the time which in the design they can use to keep the timer going. And if it made a difference it would have to be spelled out in the instructions.
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On 2/21/2012 6:36 AM, Doug wrote:

A link to what you are talking about would help.
Is it just a timer in addition to the 3-way switches? (It can connect across the travelers.) How is it powered? Does it have a battery? Does it need a neutral?
If it replaces a 3-way switch how is the timer is powered? Does it need a neutral?
Using the 3-way switches should not affect the timer.
--
bud--





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wrote:

Sorry Bud I was in a rush this morning to make an appointment. Here is the timer I had in mind.... http://www.intermatic.com/Products/Timers/InWallTimers/Electronic_Timers/ST01.aspx
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Jimmie
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Thought about it some more, it just may work at either place since it has a battery. As long as the battery is good it would turn it on regardless of where it is located. Once on it would run off the AC and charge the battery. This is a lot of assuming, The diagram still shows it being used toward the AC main. It would be nice if the manufacturer included this info.
Jimmie
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JIMMIE is an idiot
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On Wed, 22 Feb 2012 05:47:12 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

First of all... I plead stupidity for wiring but is my question legit whether the timer needs to be closest to the circuit panel or not? I would hate to call them up for this question as they could easily talk circles around me because of my lack of knowledge.
Anyway for the moment I've decided to order 2 timers and each will be put on a non-3 way switch but I asked because I was thinking later on wiring one up on a 3 way switch. I wonder what is the worst I could do if I mess it up on the 3 way switch.... I'm thinking either trip the circuit breaker or burn out the timer???
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Per the above discussion, the instructions don't say that it can only be installed on the power side of the circuit. Bu the example schematics they provide only show it installed that way. You should just call them up. It's their instructions that are poor. You would think they would get a lot of calls because of this and that they would clarify it. But, sadly, it doesn't seem to work that way....

I would think that if it was intended to only be used on the power end and you instead put it on the light end, it simply would not work. The chances of you burning it out if it's otherwise connected correctly I believe are very small.
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On 2/22/2012 10:13 AM, Doug wrote:

The question is not closest to the panel, but the 3-way switch that connects to power (may not be closes to panel).
It is a question anyone should ask.

Only Leviton can tell you if the timer at the 'other' end would work (unless someone tries it). My guess is it wouldn't. When used as a single pole switch the instructions don't care which wire connects to which - might suggest that the timer could be at the 'other' end. I certainly agree with trader that Leviton should have said in the instructions.
Other than that, the timer has a lot of interesting features.

I would be very surprised if anything happened except it didn't work. The other 3-way switch may or may not work.
----------------------- [The battery is not rechargeable.]
--
bud--



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wrote:

Thanks and I noted from the reviews that the battery will need to be replaced every 2 or more years. I decided to take your advice and I emailed the manufacturer on their website regarding the wiring on a 3 way switch. Hopefully my question is clear and their answer only needs to be a simple yes or no. I did state that it was for a house in the United States in case that mattered.
If and when I get an answer, I'll post back here what they said.
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On 2/21/2012 10:55 AM, Doug wrote:

http://www.intermatic.com/Products/Timers/InWallTimers/Electronic_Timers/ST01.aspx
The timer is wired differently from a normal 3-way switch. One normal 3-way connects to power, the other to the light. The timer has to replace the 3-way that connects to power. This may or may not be the switch closest to the panel. Easiest way to determine is probably a meter. The other 3-way is rewired as a single pole switch and appears to not carry the load current (it is a control circuit).
The timer does not need a neutral and operates entirely off of a battery. That means you won't loose the memory settings or programmed functions. Since it works with CFLS and LEDs and clicks it must use a relay, which apparently operates off the battery.
--
bud--


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I had one and wired it so the common was coming off the hot wire. It worked. Don't know if it will work with the common going to the load. If it doesn't you would think it would be included in the literature. One thing I didn't like about it was that couldn't manually check it with an ohmmeter to see which wire was common. This was a real pain because the documentation came up missing for a couple of days.
Jimmie
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JIMMIE is an idiot
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No Jimmie isn't an idiot, I'm the idiot. I'm the one asking the question !!!!
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