Electrically boobie-trapping an aluminum sash window

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Has anyone done this before ? Id like to do this to two windows on the backside of my house which is ideal to break into since I back up to a dark forest. Have had problems with the next door neighbor vandalizing on a small scale but its escalating. SInce the aluminum sash is surrounded by non conducting wood and vinyl siding, Im hoping it is as simple as bringing the hot of a 115 v. outlet to the sash and fastening it tightly down. I live by myself so theres no concern for others getting accidentally shocked. The house is in FLorida which just passed new laws in October saying essentially, that, homeowners dont need to retreat and can stand their ground with a person breaking in. Tips please on using this method ? Thanks.
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Tip: Don't. You're misinterpreting the law. Don't try and debate the law in your next message(s). Give a lawyer $100 to explain it to you.
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On 10/24/2010 9:52 AM, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Agreed. Potentially lethal booby traps, spring guns, et al, are NOT covered under the 'no duty to retreat' thing. Most states, they are specifically called out as illegal. A wandering kid, a utility guy, or an emergency services worker that HAD to make entry, could fall victim.
No duty to retreat means you can stand there with a shotgun aimed at the burglar, and use it if you feel your life is at risk. And the DA pretty much has to take your word for it. (Does the Florida law also address the civil suits from the burglar's family?)
On the slim chance this isn't a troll, there are all sorts of less lethal solutions available. Motion-sensor lights and alarms, security bars (with interior release so you don't get trapped in a fire), better window latches, plastic glazing that is harder to break, a dog in the back yard, and so on and so on.
--
aem sends...

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On 10/24/2010 11:45 AM, aemeijers wrote:

I've often wondered about this: If a booby trap is illegal, would a remote controlled weapon be illegal if it could only go off if you triggered while watching the perp on a video system or periscope? If you're on the second floor, you hear a noise, look out the window to see a do-bad prying open a first floor window and you hit the switch that supplies power to that old power company transformer you found in the woods which when hooked up in reverse takes the 240 volts from your house and turns it into 4,160 volts applied to the window frames, would that be illegal? Just wondering. 8-)
I swear officer, a bolt of lightning came out of the clear blue sky. It must have been punishment from a higher power (no pun).
TDD
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in
Excellent summary. The law rarely equates the value of property with that of life, even a low-life scum-sucking house burglar. You can take a life defending your life, but taking a life defending only property is probably going to get your butt in jail. Obviously any sort of "deadfall" that operates when you're not even there is equating the value of your property with that of a human life. Courts almost uniformly are against taking the law into your own hands because it cuts them out of the loop. (-: As you noted, the law is mostly concerned with you accidentally executing a public servant like a cop or a fireman.
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

TEXAS PENAL CODE: Sec. 9.42. DEADLY FORCE TO PROTECT PROPERTY. A person is justified in using deadly force against another to protect land or tangible, movable property: (1) if he would be justified in using force against the other under Section 9.41; and (2) when and to the degree he reasonably believes the deadly force is immediately necessary: (A) to prevent the other's imminent commission of arson, burglary, robbery, aggravated robbery, theft during the nighttime, or criminal mischief during the nighttime; or (B) to prevent the other who is fleeing immediately after committing burglary, robbery, aggravated robbery, or theft during the nighttime from escaping with the property; and (3) he reasonably believes that: (A) the land or property cannot be protected or recovered by any other means; or (B) the use of force other than deadly force to protect or recover the land or property would expose the actor or another to a substantial risk of death or serious bodily injury.
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tangible,
Section
of
I said "rarely" and stand by that. Texas is the exception to a LOT of rules. Even their "property exemption" has some serious limitations: "Cannot be protected by other means" and "would expose the actor or another to substantial risk" and apparently, only at night. My guess is that it's worded that way to aloow the DA to decide whether you meet those rather rigorous standards.
I'm not sure our sash executioner would fall under those exemptions. Wait, I take that back. I *am* sure those exemptions don't concern him: He's already told us he's a Floridian working under their penal codes.
My journalism prof once said "If you want to commit adultery, don't do it in Texas!" because Texas was then well-known as a place where you could *still* shoot your wife's lover without serious consequence. Probably still is, at least in the rural counties. They call it "misdemeanor murder" and it's a reason I said earlier: don't do the crime if you're ugly. MM is a term that loosely means the murder of an unsympathetic victim that results in probation instead of real hard time or judicial homicide.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Misdemeanor_murder
The excerpt you submitted is not typical of most state penal codes involving the use of deadly force to defend property, AFAIK.
My guess is that it's a holdover from the good ol' days of "Lonesome Dove" where rustlers were routinely used to decorate trees. From ropes. Even if they used to be your riding buddies. That pioneer spirit dies hard and so did the rustlers.
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

Well, yeah, it's not like you get a free shot. On the other hand, it's your word against a dead man's. And nighttime applies only to theft or criminal mischief. You can shoot a burglar et al during the daytime. Criminal mischief includes such things as wheelies in the lawn, burning crosses, or papering a house.

Used to be. We called it the "Paramour Statute." But the courts so narrowed its application that you had to literally shoot the dude out of the saddle. So to speak.
Very famous case where the husband shot and killed both the wife and her sex partner. The DA couldn't prosecute for the death of the lover, so he tried the husband for the murder of the wife. The defense was simple: Since the husband was in the performance of a lawful act (killing the sampler), and there was no showing of negligence on the part of the husband, the homicide could be of a degree no higher than "excusable," for which there is no criminal penalty.
The state's "Paramour Statute" has been replaced with the common law defense of "But yer honor, he needed killin' " defense.

Nope. Actually added during the massive revision of the Penal Code in 1976.
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Depends on how unsympathetic your victim is. I think shooting New Yawkers is still relatively punishment free, if they "needed killing."

And that's the way I like it. It's why my cop buddies say: "If you're going to shoot, shoot to kill." Which is why you should have an orphaned screwdriver (i.e. not 1 of a set of 6 from your toolbox) around to insert into the dead man's hand so it's self defense. Might not work so well if you kill a relative, although there was a case recently where a man shot his newlywed wife thinking she was a burglar - and walked. I always wondered whether he just decided he didn't really like being married after all.

There was a case here where a foreign student was shot because he went to the wrong house, in costume, for a Halloween party. When he wouldn't leave, and continued making gestures and speaking in Turkish (IIRC), the homeowner shot him. And walked. The law here *expects* you to call the police in such situations but the reality is that the response time lag often means the damage is already done by the time they arrive. My experience has been mixed.
A while back, I saw someone skulking about in the backyard at 11PM on my IR CCTV. I went and got my Glock and my 2M candlepower spot. Turns out the spotlight blinded him so severely that he couldn't see to run away! He just stood there, blinking hard, trying to spin a yarn about why he was in my backyard.
The cops showed up within 2 minutes of being called and arrested him and his buddy in a car waiting down the street. And, to my delight, both resisted arrest. I don't know if PG County Maryland's rep extends much beyond the DC area, but out of all the cops to resist, they are not to be f*cked with. I was hoping they would have tasered the MF, but I guess a couple of whacks with a nightstick, a sap or a maglight are just as good.

narrowed
saddle.
Yes, I forgot to mention getting off was only a sure thing if you caught them "in flagrante delicto."

sex
homicide
I wonder if it has any deterrent effect on adultery? Somehow, knowing how the little head thinks, I doubt it.

defense
(-: That covers a lot of people.

1976.
Haven't you ever seen "Walker, Texas Ranger?" They may have passed it in 1976 but I'm betting the sentiment behind it was very much 1876 based.
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

Once. Show is pure fiction.
In the show, Walker travels with his faithful Negro companion, James Trivette. In real life, Rangers are not often seen together inasmuch as there's only one Ranger for each of Texas' 254 counties.
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One riot, one Ranger. Learned that from the Miami Vice that starred Willie Nelson (probably the second best one behind Smugglers Blues- grin)
--
"Even I realized that money was to politicians what the ecalyptus tree is to
koala bears: food, water, shelter and something to crap on."
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Now you are insulting fiction. Pure BS, maybe. It is hilarious to watch, however, to see how many police procedures can be violated within 60 minutes. The Hawaii 50 reboot is lookding to beat their record, from what I've seen, but they've got a ways to go.

You know an awful lot about it for seeing one episode. Hmmmmmm. (-:
-- Bobby G.
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On Tue 26 Oct 2010 12:49:11a, Robert Green told us...

Friends of mine wired their steel doors and window frames with the same equipment that powers an electric fence to keep livestock inside. Enough to give you a good wallop, but not usually enough to kill you.
--

~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Neither a punch to the jaw nor tattooing a giant penis on the subject's back are likely to lead to death, but they are still assaults.
<http://www.myfoxorlando.com/dpps/news/offbeat/man-tattoos-lewd-image-on-friend-charged-with-assault-dpgonc-20101026-fc_10290622
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On 10/25/2010 8:07 AM, HeyBub wrote:

None of that makes booby traps legal. They are referring to the homeowner standing there with a gun.
--
aem sends...

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aemeijers wrote:

Right. The comment was whether deadly force could be used to defend property. In Texas, it can. In more benighted realms, some evidently feel that no property is worth a human life, not even a lawnmower or pot plant.
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well, don't do what this guy did: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Booby+trap+kills/3714797/story.html
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That's one way to clean up the gene pool. Duh.
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The dude was 75. I am thinking his contributions to the gene pool had already been made.
--
"Even I realized that money was to politicians what the ecalyptus tree is to
koala bears: food, water, shelter and something to crap on."
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Then he will sue you for the damage it caused him and win, kill him and its murder. Spend the money and time setting up a camera system to catch him, that will stop him.
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