Electrical work in England

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When you do electrical work in England, do you twist the wires to the left or the right?
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On 8/16/16 9:16 PM, cowabunga dude wrote:

You are thinking of Australia ;-)
In England, the black is neutral, and the white is hot, I think ?!
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I forgot there are other backward countries.
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brown. Previously the neutral was black, and the lines were red, yellow, and blue.
Only Australia, Brazil, New Zealand and South Africa use a white "line" conductor in AC power systems. -
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Since everything in those countries is 220, do they have to get an electrician every time they need electrical work done?
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On 8/16/2016 11:58 PM, cowabunga dude wrote:

Why? It is no more dangerous than working on 220 here. Of course if everyone followed the rules here they would get a permit to change a lightbulb and have it inspected.
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Not really true. 220 in other countries is line to neutral (above ground) In the US 120/240 is just 120 to neutral/ground. You have to go line to line to see 240
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On 8/17/2016 12:17 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

OK, hold these wires and I'll flip the breaker on. Let me know how it feels and then we'll try it in London.
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exactly the same. It will only hit you 50 times a second in London - and 60 times a second over here.
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On Wed, 17 Aug 2016 16:32:24 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The reality is most people are grounded and touch an ungrounded conductor. You have to work hard to grab 2 conductors.
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The legal aspect is what I was wondering about. In the US we're SUPPOSED to get an electrician to do 220 work, although I've done my own many times.
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On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 23:18:27 -0500, "cowabunga dude"

Why do you think 120v is exempt? In places where "owner/builder" is legal, there is no difference between 120 and 240. You are still supposed to have a permit for any changes to the fixed wiring in your building. Whether you need a licensed electrician is up to local/state law
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Uncle Monster wrote:

Out here in the woods of north central Arkansas it's still that way . There are no building codes or inspections , though the insurance company might want to look at the wiring before issuing a policy . I haven't asked ... they're probably not going to issue until construction is pretty much finished , so if it burns we're screwed . Just because there are no codes/inspections doesn't mean that I'm going to take any stupid shortcuts , everything I'm doing would pass code in any place that allows owners to perform the work . Little things like locating wiring where it passes thru framing far enough from finished surfaces that say a drywall screw isn't going to penetrate is important ...
--
Snag



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On Wed, 17 Aug 2016 06:38:03 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

Farmers are usually exempt and there are plenty of rural places with no building codes at all
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On Wed, 17 Aug 2016 06:38:03 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

not required and you can build a rendering plant right next door the a rich man's "castle". They are becoming more rare every year.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

That's a fragrant prospect...
--
Tekkie

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wrote:

eastern New York, and quite a bit of the rural Carolinas, as well as much of the hollers of Kentucky and Tennessee (much of Appalachia) where the unregulated townships are (or at least were until VERY recently) quite common. I've heard stories of the "big man" in certain areas falling out of favour with the local population and having similar "industries" spring up across the road or next door - sometimes financed by the "big man" from the next county, or a local political opponent.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

I guess zoning laws have not reached these precincts. Of course with the laws comes enforcement costs and manipulation and user fees...
--
Tekkie

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On the subject of stinking. A year ago a company built an oilfield tank battery about 1/2 mile away. I've since learned it stores frac chemicals. There are days that stink lingers over here on days of no wind. The smell can get quite strong indoors.
The people living closer are probably having worse problems.
There is also a oilfield water hauling company that pumps so much water out of the ground that people closer than me are having problems of their water wells going dry.
This whole area is not zoned and unregulated for what you can do on the land.
There is pasture land appx 400 feet away where cattle have been grazing. That smell can be strong, but better tolerated than frac chemicals.
Some other neighbors let their herd of 25+ goats roam unattended during the day, which come here and strip leaves off trees, and get up in juniper trees and break limbs off. At least they were unattended until I started shooting some of their goats. Now they try to keep them off my land. I tried for many years to talk them into controlling the goats. They pretend they don't speak English, which pisses me off because I know they speak English, when they want to.
They're lucky I only use a 22 to shoot the goats and also that I hate goat meat or they'd really wouldn't like it.
Peoples horses, cows and sheep come over and graze and drink water, and I don't have a problem with that because they don't damage trees or shrubs.
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When I had a dog it would bark and run around the goats and they would ignore the dog so bad it was almost neurotic.
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