Electrical wiring questions

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I have an old house that I am fixing up before I move in. It has a 100-amp circuit breaker main electric panel. It also has old wiring -- some knob and tub, some next generation "cloth covered" wiring, etc. No modern NM or "Romex". Right now, I am putting in all new wiring and receptacles in the first floor that is above an unfinished basement -- so access to the receptacles is easy. I know how to connect the circuits, what wires go to what, etc.
Here's my question:
If I'm putting in receptacles in the living room and dining room, and running the horizontal wiring along the basement ceiling, how is the wiring to each receptacle typically run?
Option 1 for me would be to run the wire to a junction box on the ceiling below each receptacle and then run wiring from each junction box to each receptacle.
Option 2 would be to not use junction boxes on the basement ceiling under each receptacle. Instead, run the wiring along the basement ceiling, then up to a receptacle, then back down to the basement ceil and on to the next receptacle, then up to that receptacle, then back down and on the next receptacle, etc.
Thanks.
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Typically you would see option #2. Option #1 is OK to do but it is more labor intensive and requires more parts.
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Thanks. I read someplace that a good design is to use less junction boxes, so I was thinking Option 2.
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wrote:

The wiring in the house I'm in now looks more like option #1. Since I don't have a basement, the junction box is above the ceiling (ceiling light box).
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Mark Lloyd
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On Tue, 23 Jan 2007 23:21:13 -0500, "BETA-32"

Option 2 is the usual way. Fold the Romex over and smash the bend flat (you are cutting it off anyway) Then you can poke it up into the hole you drill in the sole plate. Don't put the old work box in the hole you cut until you have found your wire. Make it up in the box and shove it in the hole.
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Thanks. I like the fold-the-romex idea.
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I'm a wonderin' what the purpose of folding it over is.
thanks,
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Steve Barker



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I think they were referring to the practice of folding over solid wire in order to stuff it into the electrical boxes. An alternate would be to use method #1 with stranded wire inside flex conduit for the runs from the basement up to the receptacle. That would make it real easy to push the receptacles into the box.
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wrote:

Daisy-chaining the romex from one outlet box to the next?
Jerry
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OHhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.. I'm a visualizing it now. Thanks!
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Steve Barker


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photos may help: http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/homewiringusa/2002/pictures/index.htm faq at: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/electrical-wiring/part1 /

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On Tue, 23 Jan 2007 23:21:13 -0500, "BETA-32"

Another reason to use #2..if you ever finish your basement, all those extra boxes can't be buried behind walls or ceilings, so you would have to flush them with the walls or ceiling and use blank covers, which is both a pain and unattractive.
Paul
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Good point. I hadn't thought of that.
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Option #2 is preferred, however if it's to difficult, you could use just a couple junction boxes in the basement, with multiple cables coming from each to individual outlets above

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I would use option #1 except only run one cable to the receptacle. That way you don't overcrowd the tiny receptacle boxes. The older receptacle boxes are often undersized and I try to keep the wiring in them to a minimum. Keep in mind that the new receptacles that you put in existing boxes will most likely be larger then the ones that you take out. If you are removing 2 prong outlets and replacing them with 3 prong outlets than this is definately the case. That and it won't be so hard to push the receptacle into the box.
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I suppose I agree with the majority opinion of #2; though neither solution is elegant. Just beware that it is alot of wire. If you get into a potential voltage drop situation, step up the wire size; use #12 for a 15a circuit.
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Not sure what you don't think isn't elegant about #2. All new construction is wired that way except the run from outlet box to outlet box is through the studs instead of down 2 feet into the floor space below and back up 2 feet into the wall.
Steve.
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After doing a lot of research, I ended up deciding to use 12/2 wiring everywhere regardless of whether it's a 15-amp or 20-amp circuit. The additional cost in materials isn't all that much and since I'm already doing the work, there's no extra labor involved either way.
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On Thu, 25 Jan 2007 08:05:09 -0500, "BETA-32"

14/2 fits in the backstab holes. I know someone who chose it for that reason.
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On Thu, 25 Jan 2007 10:48:10 -0600, Mark Lloyd

The backstab holes only make sense for a bottom feeding contractor who is going for the lowest possible bid. It certainly saves time but reliability suffers. Homeowners wiring their own home should take the extra minute to use the screws.
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