Electrical wiring advice needed

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Installing three motion detector outside lights at daughter's house. Power to come from panel in basemen. Wiring on outside of building will be surf ace, either pvc or emt conduit. No aesthetic issues due to location.
Question: How do I change from romex inside the garage to conduit outside the building. Rumor has it that I am not allowed to run romex in conduit (o verheating??). If I do the change-over in an electrical box, it has to be accessible. Not doable in the to-be finished basement with tenant. I supp ose an outside weather resistant box will be required. Any ideas? Also, is there any need for a switch? Three lights, three outdoor switches ? Circuit would be from a dedicated breaker. Lights are so the tenant can walk down a long narrow sideyard, turn the cor ner and go down the stairs to his unit. All help appreciated.
Ivan Vegvayr
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On Tuesday, March 1, 2016 at 10:20:27 AM UTC-5, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

er to come from panel in basemen. Wiring on outside of building will be su rface, either pvc or emt conduit. No aesthetic issues due to location.

e the building. Rumor has it that I am not allowed to run romex in conduit (overheating??). If I do the change-over in an electrical box, it has to b e accessible. Not doable in the to-be finished basement with tenant. I su ppose an outside weather resistant box will be required.
I'm confused. If the Romex is in the garage, why are you mentioning accessi ble junction boxes in a finished basement?

There are many different styles of weather proof PVC junction boxes available so that you can transition from Romex in the garage to THHN for running through Schedule 40 PVC. Just make sure that you properly protect the wire as it passes through the wall.
You could also use a junction box inside the garage and then run your conduit through the wall and use these to make neat turns and connections to the external conduit. They come in both PVC and metal.
http://i1.quinbyhardware.com/6556641.jpg

es? Circuit would be from a dedicated breaker.

orner and go down the stairs to his unit.

I can't speak to the "need" for switch but there may be a *desire* for a switch. Most motion detectors can be switched on by flipping the switch on-off-on in whatever pattern/timing the manufacturer chose. This can be useful for times when you want the lights on for an extended period of time. In this case, a couple of 3 way switches (one at each end of the long narrow side yard) would certainly be convenient.
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On Tue, 1 Mar 2016 07:49:31 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Panel in garage. Romex from panel in garage through basement to location directly below motion light. Conduit up the outside of wall to lamp.
I'd likely put a switch next to the panel (or use switch rated breaker in panel - dedicated to the lights) and then tun the romex out through a foundation bushing to a weatherproof J-Box at the bottom of the conduit. Then THHN or romex up the "protection" conduit.
Option is to run conduit from last accessible J-Box location in basement all the way to the lights with thhn pulled - no hidden junctio required. More work, but possibly better solution.
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On Tuesday, March 1, 2016 at 12:28:47 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Romex is not approved for wet locations and I think most would consider an outside, exposed conduit a wet location. Of course, you'll never learn the error of your ways because you have me blocked, along with others here because they point out when you're wrong. Especially on electrical.

Simple solution is to run Romex inside, put a junction box outside where it exits, use thwn the rest of the way. You probably need a box there anyway, to be able to reasonably pull the wires. Also, THHN is not rated for wet locations, but most THHN is dual rated THWN anyways. But since you like to mention that you think I'm a jerk and that you've blocked me, thought I'd point that out too.
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Correct. [...]

Might be even simpler to run UF the whole way. UF is approved for *dry* locations as well as wet ones, so it's perfectly fine to use UF indoors.
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On Sun, 6 Mar 2016 16:16:20 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

Inside a properly installed conduit is a "dry location". and for external use where it is subject to mechanical damage even UF may need to be enclosed in conduit.
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On Sun, 06 Mar 2016 18:12:24 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

No it isn't. Anything outside exposed to the weather is a wet location.
NEC article 100 Location, Wet. Installations underground or in concrete slabs or masonry in direct contact with the earth; in locations subject to saturation with water or other liquids, such as vehicle washing areas; and in UNPROTECTED LOCATIONS EXPOSED TO WEATHER.
Being in conduit does not change that
The NEC handbook commentary says this "The inside of a raceway in a wet location and a raceway installed underground are considered wet locations. Therefore, any conductors contained therein would be required to be suitable for wet locations."
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On Sun, 06 Mar 2016 22:59:11 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

All I know is around here a sealed conduit system is not considered an "unprotected location exposed to weather". and nor is a weatherproof outdoor receptacle on the outside wall of a house. Now, thei "conduit" can NOT be EMT in this instance, because EMT is not a "sealed conduit system" like a glued sceptre system or a threaded Ridgid conduit or a electra-flex or liqui-tite flexible conduit.
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On Monday, March 7, 2016 at 7:48:09 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Uneducable, obviously.
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On Mon, 07 Mar 2016 07:47:28 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

These systems are far from "sealed" and most will collect water over time. That is particularly true if it is underground. The conduit joints might be water tight but the condulets and box covers are far from it. They breathe, moisture infiltrates and condenses.
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On Mon, 07 Mar 2016 12:39:15 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

OK - the OP was definitely not talking about underground. He's talking running conduit up a wall to a light., and the cover on a weatherproof box is water tight. The "Liquid-tite" conduit running to my wall mounted security light IS waterproof - it is certifiable for underwater lighting use, and the cover it comes out of, on the J-Box it connects to, is also "weather-tite". No danger of water getting into the "conduit system" in any way. A sceptre plastic system can be every bit as tight. Mine passed inspection with no problems.
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On Monday, March 7, 2016 at 3:32:51 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

http://www.wesbellwireandcable.com/blog/why-romexcopy-cant-be-used-outdoors/
And of course there is danger of water getting into the conduit, it's called condensation. It's not airtight, humid air gets, in it cools, now you have some moisture. And I've yet to see a perfect oudoor box either. They rely on gaskets that aren't perfect, some water can get in around screws, etc. It's also really stupid here, because the OP can just run type UF, which is permitted inside and out and no inspector will fail it. I think it's probably easier to transition to THWN where it goes outside, but that's just me.
But feel free to keep me on your ignore list and keep pissing in the wind.
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On Mon, 07 Mar 2016 15:32:13 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Underwater lights are sealed units (NEMA 6P) including the SJOW cord which goes all the way to the box above the deck. The niches they install in are flooded so the "liquid tite" going to it is wet on one end, all the way back to the water level. That is why the pool light J box is always elevated a foot or two above the ground. That raceway is full of water and the reason why it needs to be "liquid tite" is so the pool won't drain.

Yeah sure, that bubble cover is really going to even keep the rain out, not to mention humid air. They are wet locations and that is why the NEC now requires weather resistant receptacles. Those boxes can end up holding water up to the level of that silly foam ring that barely seals the day it was installed and a year later it usually crumbles to dust if you touch it..

No doubt it passes inspection but it is not certified "waterproof" only "rain tight" (NEMA3r). Do you really think it is "air tight" and that is what you need to prevent condensation.
This is what NEMA says about 3r "NEMA 3R enclosures are typically used in outdoor applications for wiring and junction boxes. This style of enclosure provides protection against falling rain, sleet, snow, and external ice formation. Indoors they protect against dripping water. This style of enclosure does not have a gasketed sealing surface. Some models have hasps for padlocking"
That little foam ring is not a "gasket"
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On Mon, 07 Mar 2016 18:03:26 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The point is, it's romex in weathertight conduit in an exterior application and it passed inspection in Canada, where the rules are generally a lot more rigig when it comes to safety standards (nanny state)

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On Mon, 07 Mar 2016 20:20:44 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Canada may have different rules about what a wet location is or the inspector just missed it.
out
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

One: Just because it passed inspection does not mean it meets code in that jurisdiction. The inspector may not have seen it -- or may have been as ignorant of the code as you are.
Two: What you *think* is code-compliant in Canada isn't necessarily code-compliant, either there or anywhere else.
Three: It's time you learned that.
Four: This is NOT compliant with the U.S. NEC, irrespective of your misguided opinions.
Five: Are you aware that you've been arguing with a master electrician (gfretwell, not me) about what does and doesn't meet Code?
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On Tue, 8 Mar 2016 12:04:31 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

Answer to one - it passed - that's all that matters to me Answer to two - I know code in Canada and elsewhere is different - and I've qualified that several times. I said "in Canada" Answer to three - I already know that - see one and two above. Answer to four - I never said it was compliant to US NEC - I said it passes here - and I'm sure it has been passed many times in many places in the USA as well - not every jurisdiction sticks strictly to the NEC
Answer to number four - all kinds of guys argue with me about automotive stuff - and I've been a "master mechanic" for over half my life - (and I'm not 30). I've been wrong a few times, and I'm sure he has been too.
Not saying he's wrong now either.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

are.

either

"Passed inspection" is not the same as "Code-compliant".

Nice try. What you *actually* said is

No qualifiers there at all.

Clearly you haven't learned it yet, as amply demonstrated by what you *actually* said (in contrast to what you now *claim* you said). This is not the first time you've made blanket statements about what's Code-compliant and what's not, without mentioning the fact that you're talking about Canadian code (or your interpretation thereof, anyway).

Again, for the record, what you *actually* said is

Again, "passed inspection" is not the same as "code compliant".

Indeed you have.

Not here, not on electrical issues -- not that I've ever noticed, anyway. I've learned a lot from reading his posts.

No, and not implying it at all, either, are you?
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On Tue, 8 Mar 2016 23:52:59 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

OK - it is a DAMP location - not wet in Canadian code, and NMD90 cable is approved for installation in "damp locations" in Canada.

No I am not. But as just stated above, nmd90 in Canada is approved for use in dry and "damp"ocations, but not wet. A properly installed protective conduit protects the cable from "wet" although it may allow the cable to be "damp" - and that passes code in Canada.
This iosn't a code document - but from Southwire's canadian website - -
• Southwire’s Romex® SIMpull ® Type NMD90 cables may be used for both exposed work in dry locations or concealed work in dry or damp locations • The maximum allowable conductor temperature is 90°C • The minimum recommended installation temperature is minus 25°C for two-conductor cables, and minus 10°C for three-conductor cables (with suitable handling procedures) • Material should be properly stored above 0°C for 24 hours prior to installation • The maximum voltage rating for all intended applications is 300 volts • Consult the Canadian Electrical Code1 for further information related to applications
Southwire’s Romex® SIMpull ® Type NMD90 cables meet or exceed the requirements of all applicable ASTM specifications, CSA C22.2 No. 48 (non-metallic sheathed cable), and the Canadian Electrical Code.1
Look up table 19 of the canadian electrical code for the permission to run NMD90 exposed in damp locations.
See also: https://www.ecswire.com/products/specs/nmd90 Also see: http://www.cerrowire.com/files/file/NMD-90.pdf
Download http://members.rennlist.org/warren/elec-hbk.pdf and search for table 19.
Does this satisfy your objections??????
Like you said - code is different in different places. I am in Canada. In Canada NMD90 cable is approved for damp locations. Vertical protection conduit connected to weatherproof box for mounting a light is a damp location.
I have now given you the cites - so can we drop it now????
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On Tue, 08 Mar 2016 21:13:33 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Cite that
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