Electrical Wire Query

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Monroe wrote:

You seem to be getting a lot of nonsense, so let's reveiw the real answers. Length-- It makes sense to make the cord longer to eliminate use any length extension cords. The length of cord you use is entirely up to you. Safe length-- From an electrical perspective, the maximum safe length assumes 2 percent power drop and depends on the size of wire. It is highly unlikely you would exceed limit this with a lamp using #18 or #16 wire. Certainly, if you stay under 1000 watts (ten 100 watt bulbs) and under 20 feet either size would be ok. I would tend to buy #16 lamp cord and not the smaller #18 cord. I suggest you look at the little blue tag on extension cords. It usually states the maximum wattage allowed. That will give you a general idea of what is safe.
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OK.
This makes no sense at all. Extension cords are a known fire hazard. Making the cord longer is essentially the same thing as using an extension cord. A longer cord or an extension cord can easily be damaged and become a fire hazard. This, in fact, has led to many fires and deaths. In fact, this is the very reason why the NEC now requires AFCI circuits for new installations in bedrooms. The safe solution is to extend the existing circuit to the equipment or install a new circuit.

No, its not, it must be no more than 6 feet long. Why not just wire the house with zip cord then?

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volts500 wrote:

Extension cord are often considered a fire because people overload them by sticking 3 or 4 appliance on one cord. Making a cord longer gets rid of an extension cord. The length per se is not a problem. What's AFCI? Most (like 99.99 percent) of people are NOT going to extend a circuit.

That's BS. There is no law that limits the length of cord you can use to rewire an appliance. And it obviously isn't true that manufacturers must not supply a cord longer than 6 feet, since I can buy all sorts of appliances that have cords that are longer than 6 feet. Hell, my 12 amp vacuum cleaner has a 35 foot cord. Hanging lamps always have long cords (10 feet or more). Heck you couldn't even hang a lamp from the ceiling and reach a socket with a 6 foot cord. Of course you would put a socket up about 6 feet on the wall so you could hang it out 3 feet from the wall. Right? Sorry for the sarcasm... no I'm not. You shouldn't "facts" that can easily be disproved by going to a store and seeing what is available.

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On 30 Jul 2003, George E. Cawthon wrote:

You need to realize that the only reason this "electrician" is giving anybody a hard time about this is that he's using it for an excuse to bust my stones.
500V reads every simngle line I write on here, uses a fine toothed comb, as it were. Finds something, -anything- he can try to give me a hard time over, he will. Guaranteed.
There's a name on Usenet for his type: Leg-humping pet.
HTH.
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TP / Network Man __________________________________
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need
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extension
become a

Among other things, yes.

That's where you're wrong. A longer cord also subjects it to a greater possibility of physical damage, which can lead to fire hazards.

Yes, it is.

Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter..........usually a circuit breaker that acts to turn off the circuit when it detects arcing in wires and cords that may have been pinched or otherwise damaged (such as a jury-rigged lamp with a 15 foot cord on it.)

Which is one reason why there are so many electrical fires in the US.........and the _very_reason why AFCI's are now being required by NEC. The NEC is phasing them in just like they did GFCI's.......by starting with bedrooms. Stats have shown that more fires happen in bedrooms from zip cords that get pinched or damaged than other rooms. It won't be long before the NEC requires other circuits to be AFCI protected in houses.

Try checking the UL listing for the appliance.........if you want to jurg-rig an appliance, by all means, have at it.

Try buying a lamp that has zip cord on it that's longer than 6 feet. If you want to ignore the fact that extra long zip cords are a possible fire hazard......that's your choice. A far as that matter, if you want to wire your house with zip cord, hey, go for it, I could care less. A vacuum cleaner is a portable device that needs a long cord.......are you just going to leave it out after using it? You will also notice that the cord is heavier duty than a zip cord. Hanging lamps have a long cord so they can reach a receptacle, and they aren't subject to damage when swagged. Funny how you didn't mention that you found a table lamp with a 20 foot zip cord on it for sale at a local retail store.
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No, an AFCI will not provide GFCI protection as we know it, and yes, one way to provide both types of protection is to install a AFCI breaker and a GFCI receptacle at the first outlet and connect the GFCI receptacle so that it provides downstream protection.
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wrote:

I read about half the replys and flames here and got tired.
To many bulls in the same pasture.
In the best of all possible worlds everything would be to code as of right now. In reality""" consider the following""" extending a run to place an outlet as near as possible to where you wish to place your lamps. Run your extended cord using 14 gage wire which will """likely"""" handle any lamp you have and as a safety consideration use cord with the toughest thickest insulation you can tollerate and do not cover it with rugs etc.
While this may not be the best of all possible worlds it is certainly going to be better than made in china etc. extension cords.
Louis
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Stoney:
S > The answer from Volts 500 ended with a comment that reminded me that I S > have a dehumidifier running in my basement all summer and it is located S > beyond its cord length from a suitable outlet serving only this device. S > It runs fine hooked to a 4 foot extension cord meant for an AC unit, and S > has been in service for about 3 years this way. HOWEVER, I noticed the S > other day that the plug of the extension cord was HOT. Too hot for S > comfort. I am not an electrician but have done a lot of my own wiring S > modifications after consulting code based help books at the time. I S > never thought running this unit on the heavy duty short extension would S > be a problem. The cords feel warm to the touch, but not hot. Would you
I'm not an electrician (some of my past answer probably reflect that! <g> but I would replace the appliance extension. Immediately. The connection inside the plug could be failing causing it to heat up. I would monitor the new cord as the failure could be in the outlet itself, transferring heat to the plug.
S > electricians recommend replacing the humidifier cord with a longer cord S > to reach the outlet, or continue to run as is as long as the connection S > is not sitting on combustible material? It is resting on a tile floor. S > It seems normal for a cord under load to be warm. At what point do you S > become concerned about the heat in the cord?
If the dehum is going to be more or less permanently in that spot I'd probably wire in it's own outlet.
S > And while I am at it, may I add as an occasional visitor to this site, S > that it is a great public service you electricians render when you S > strongly advise some of the hopeful against doing their own electrical
Yes, some people just should not do anything more than change a light bulb!
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
* Lie to make people angry. Tell truth to make them livid.
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Stoney:
S > The answer from Volts 500 ended with a comment that reminded me that I S > have a dehumidifier running in my basement all summer and it is located S > beyond its cord length from a suitable outlet serving only this device. S > It runs fine hooked to a 4 foot extension cord meant for an AC unit, and S > has been in service for about 3 years this way. HOWEVER, I noticed the S > other day that the plug of the extension cord was HOT. Too hot for S > comfort. I am not an electrician but have done a lot of my own wiring S > modifications after consulting code based help books at the time. I S > never thought running this unit on the heavy duty short extension would S > be a problem. The cords feel warm to the touch, but not hot. Would you
I'm not an electrician (some of my past answer probably reflect that! <g> but I would replace the appliance extension. Immediately. The connection inside the plug could be failing causing it to heat up. I would monitor the new cord as the failure could be in the outlet itself, transferring heat to the plug.
S > electricians recommend replacing the humidifier cord with a longer cord S > to reach the outlet, or continue to run as is as long as the connection S > is not sitting on combustible material? It is resting on a tile floor. S > It seems normal for a cord under load to be warm. At what point do you S > become concerned about the heat in the cord?
If the dehum is going to be more or less permanently in that spot I'd probably wire in it's own outlet.
S > And while I am at it, may I add as an occasional visitor to this site, S > that it is a great public service you electricians render when you S > strongly advise some of the hopeful against doing their own electrical
Yes, some people just should not do anything more than change a light bulb!
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
* Lie to make people angry. Tell truth to make them livid.
--
RoseReader 2.52 P003186
The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA 563-359-1971
  Click to see the full signature.
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Thanks, Barry. Volts500 had suggested running the outlet extension, and I will do so. I would have to move my file cabinets every summer to use a longer dehumidifier cord on this existing outlet, so will go ahead with the permanent fix. This hot connection is probably because the plug is not really a tight fit. The dehumidifier itself is a Sears that has been running every summer for 30 years without a hiccup and it has an excellent industrial strength plug as was common when it was built. It is the extension cord socket that is at fault in the loose fit. Best cord HDepot had. But anymore, best available is not saying much. Maybe building a cord with industrial grade socket and plug from an industrial or electrical supply house might do the trick. Another project to add to the list.
Stoney
barry martin wrote:

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