Electrical switch -- no longer controls outlets -- Help??

Page 3 of 3  

wrote:

From what you've written, I can't tell what you've missed, didn't miss, or what you're talking about. My statement to the OP, was that even in a panel with a single main circuit breaker, there will be live wires even with the main turned off, similar to that of a split buss panel. The only difference is that the upper buss always remains live in the split buss panel, even with all the mains turned off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

Only this: In any panel I've ever been into, which doesn't measure in the hundreds but is quite a few, and this included my own:
Main breakers kill power to the entire iinards of the box except for their input side. The input side can only connect to the meter, which, unless pulled, leaves the input sides powered. Power only exists on the wires coming FROM the meter up TO the main breakers. There will be NO power on either of the busses, either phase, or anywhere else. With the Mains turned OFF, NOTHING is powered, no voltage exists except as noted above, which is kinda a necessity. What's so hard to understand about that? When you open the two phases coming INTO the box, nothing else has a source of power. Same as pulling the meter except there wouldn't even be power to the Main Breakers then. Transformer feeds meter feeds Mains Breakers, feeds individual house breakers that hang on the busses. It's that simple, no?
Twayne
--
--
We've already reached
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That was essentially the point I was making to the OP. There is always live power in the panel, even with the main off, albeit only at the terminals to the main breaker. This is not exactly true with a split buss panel however. The main wires don't connect to a breaker, but instead, they connect to the terminals feeding the main breaker buss, which generally holds up to six double pole breakers. One of those breakers feeds the lower buss. This entire upper buss is live regardless of the position of the main breakers attached to it, making it a little more dangerous to work in live.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tim birr wrote: ...

...
Never had one yet that wouldn't assuming you have a small-enough blade to actually insert into the opening and push it sufficiently far enough to actually release the spring.
Even w/o, a pair of pliers and pulling while rotating back and forth and the wire will "walk" back out. Certainly no need to destroy the receptacle (or switch/whatever).
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

I"ve had some pretty cheap ones where I would release the tab but the tab would break off the contact. I replaced 'em all with new spec grade ones with wires under the screw terminals.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

Why not destroy it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 24 Dec 2009 15:46:36 -0800 (PST), tim birr

Go to sleep. Santa will fix it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Did you even THINK to draw a diagram of how the OLD outlet was wired? Seems obvious that you haven't a clue how it was wired. Was the white on the side of the outlet with the silver screws and the black and red on the side with the brass screws. each on it's own screw?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The new outlet has a piece of metal that ties the two sockets together. If you have separate wires (black and red) going to each individual outlet, you need to break that tab off on the black/red side of the outlet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark wrote:

He wired it exactly like the original. The problem isn't in his wiring.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In

Well; worked before the rewire, doesn't work after the rewire. Whatever was done was botched somehow. Could have been simply a wire-stressed switch that quit working and once the stress was relieved by taking the wires off and putting them back, the switch could work. But the wires don't seem to have been put back properly. I've seen cheap switches that wouldn't work if the wires stressed them just right, as in twisting the outlet, which ends up straight because of the screws holding it in.
Because of the "red" wire and the outlet controls, I'm wondering if this isn't actually a 3-way switch? In which case not putting the wires back properly would cause the same problem described. Right?
Pretty hard to see it very clearly from here<G>.
Twayne
--
--
Cats land on their feet.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Twayne wrote:

If you go back and read the thread, you'll see the problem was solved long ago.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Suppose the OP was among the 10% of males who are color-blind, he couldn't tell the difference between the gold and silver screws. He could probably tell the difference between red, black and white wires.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can't remember the stats, but it's something like 8% have red green color blind problems, some percent are "shades of grey" color blind, maybe 1%.
I'm in the third category. I've got three what I call "color groups". Often I can't tell blue or purple. And often I can't tell yellow or orange. And often I have trouble with red, green, and brown. I've learned to carry red acetate on heating jobs, to help tell colors. And to have someone else check the colors before I power up equipment.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

.
OP again...As I thought I mentioned in my original post, all wires were put in exactly as on the original outlet. Didn't need to draw a diagram to remember where to put the three (well four with the ground) wires in relation to the new outlet. Actually, I usually just snap a digital pix when I do need to replace complicated car wiring, etc.
It was just that crazy copper tab that needed "fixin" LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In

Good point! In fact, many people don't know there's a difference anyway, nor the meaning of the color difference.
Twayne
--
--
Cats land on their feet.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.