Electrical switch -- no longer controls outlets -- Help??

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I find those receptacles listed in a 1925 Westinghouse catalog, which I assume predates NEMA. Some are rated at 10 amps 250 volts, others are rated 10 amps 250 volts - 15 amps 125 volts, however the receptacles are identical. I suppose, back in 1925 you needed to know how it was wired before you plugged into it.
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[snip]

That could explain no 2-15R on the charts. I wish there was a note thee, so it doesn't look like an oversight.
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wrote:
[snip]

Yes it's a 240VAC plug, and the missing 2-15R would be a 240VAC receptacle.

I don't know the purpose. I thought there may be some explanation for the oddity in the NEMA charts, and it might fit.

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On Fri, 25 Dec 2009 22:23:30 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Do you admit it (2-15R receptacle) is missing from that chart?
If it looks like anything, shouldn't it be in the chart? All the other plugs have matching receptacles. What happened to this one?
Anyway, would you ever want to plug a 2-15R into the receptacle Nate was talking about?
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Nate Nagel wrote:

I've always heard them called "T-slots". At least about 20 years ago they were available and used for replacements on ungrounded circuits.
Never heard what the function of the horizontal slots was. Was there a real old 115V plug configuration with both slots horizontal? I never tried, but I suspect the horizontal slots are not wide enough (long direction) for a 220V plug.
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wrote:

The NEMA 2-15 style was the standard plug for a 220v circuit before WWII. This would usually be a heater since the room A/C was not around yet. When you used a T slot on 110v plugging in a 220v heater would not cause a problem, it would just provide 1/4ths the heat. ... at least that is the story I have heard
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wrote:

Have no idea about the amps stuff for the electric outlets , just using what an electrician told me to use after I had him here several years ago to swap out my "split buss" electrical main panel. I think that was the term. It had no main shut-off and was always hot.
Made me nervous when I had to replace a faulty water heater circuit breaker before I had the panel upgraded. I wore rubber boots. Two pairs of thick rubber gloves, stood on a board and said my prayers when I did that circuit breaker swap out.
The new outlets he told me to use seem pretty quality -- and of course cost $4.50 a pop. They seem to be more "rubberized" sort of material instead of the brittle plastic of the contractor-installed original outlets.
I originally asked the electrician how to remove the wires from the "spring catches" without breaking apart the old outlet. He just ignored my question and gave me an empty outlet package and told to replace them with "this kind."
FYI, your old split buss panel didn't have "a" main breaker, it had several main breakers including the one you changed. The main wires in your new panel are still live regardless if the breaker being on or off.
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In wrote:

What? Did I miss something? Kill the two Main breakers in my panel, and the only power left in the box is going TO those breakers. Nothing, nada, on the power bars or anywhere else. I know for sure; I always check for power presence either with a meter or the ol' screwdriver test (but not inside the entrance box!). Or was that just a bad attempt at sarcasm? <g>
Twayne
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wrote:

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Metspitzer wrote:

That's a quick way to burn down a house, as somebody actually proved not long ago -- I think the news item was even discussed in this newsgroup.
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wrote:
[snip]

Does it work on FPE panels?
I know a couple of people who had them, but those houses have already burned down (or was that "burned up"?).
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In

More ignorance; you don't even know what such a test is.
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wrote:

You're welcome to that belief.
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In wrote:

That wasn't a screwdrive test; it was stupidity and ignorance. See my previous post.
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That's an *excellent* description of your posts: "stupidity and ignorance".
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In wrote:

lol, can't read, can you?
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Metspitzer wrote:

It's a near relative of the "Smoke Test."
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In wrote:

Position the wire ends so a clean screwdrive can be pressed against one wire while moving the screwdriver over and past the other. If no sparks, solidly connect the two wires for a quick moment. Got sparks? The power's NOT off! Alternatively you can take just one wire and pass the screwdriver across the metal box or ground wire; will tell you if you've got a hot neutral too. I know some people who'll make a solid contact right away, figureing they'll pop the breaker that way but that's bad advice. Fire possibility in the walls, weakening of the breaker mechanism, etc.. The screwdriver test, done correctly, results in neither of those. Actually, it's also handy to prove or disprove that the 100V you're seeing with a meter is a phantom voltage. Or not. <g>
Twayne
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What a moron. Ever hear of a test lamp?
Please, don't take electrical advice from Twayne. He's completely clueless.
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On Sat, 26 Dec 2009 22:41:09 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

A lot of people are ignorant concerning electricity (I remember someone's claim that you can't use a clock on a 20A circuit. The high current would burn it up). Some are even proud of their ignorance.
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