Electrical service - 240v line

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If I wanted to have a dedicated 240v outlet installed, who would do that, the electric company or an independent electrician? Would they have to wire it special from the street, or is there already a line at my circuit box that's 240v? How much would it cost? thanks.
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wire
You'd call a regular electrician. You have 240V capability at your service entrance (e.g. breaker box) -- they just need to run a line from there to wherever you want the outlet.
Cost will vary depending on distance from the box and difficulty in running the line.
-Tim
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jeffc wrote:

There should be 240v into your electrical panel and meter. A contractor will be the one to call. The cost depends upon the difficulty of the installation and upon the contractor's rates. You can expect anywhere from $100 to $500, depending upon several factors. Ask around for references. Usually you get what you pay for.
hvacrmedic
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I hear dat. I did some contracting for awhile (not electrical). I showed up on time, sober, and did what I said I was gonna do. They thought I was the mac daddy contractor of all time.
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All you need to do is to buy a 240V breaker for the main breaker box and wire it to your outlet receptacle. You can do that yourself. Read up the wiring instructions from DIY home wiring book or ask the hardware store salesman. Install an incompatible 240 type receptacle so that someone won't make the dangerous mistake of plugging in a regular 115V device and start a fire. I presume you know the usual precautions about work safety when doing your own electrical installations.
I have a feeling you have a 240V appliance from a 240V system country that is too pricey to throw out. If it is only a single 240 consumer appliance that doesn't draw too much power its a lot easier just to buy a 115V to 240V step up transformer from the sewing machine dealer which has a ready to use unit complete with plug and socket connections.
One easy alternative way to get a dedicated outlet is to modify the duplex outlet already in your kitchen. Duplex outlets in Canadian or US kitchens are normaly wired to separate 115V breakers for the upper and the lower outlet. The reasoning is that often these outlets are overloaded with one too many kitchen gadgets like a toaster, coffee pot, egg beater, etc. so that popping a breaker is not uncommon. Having a separate circuit for the upper and the lower outlet means that when one outlet is popped the other one can still be used (assuming the wife and the kids are not knowledgeable about resetting the breaker.)
Okay, the way to get 240V out of this is to connect the hot wire of the upper outlet to your 240 outlet live wire screw. Then connect the live wire of your lower outlet to the neutral of the 240 outlet screw. Tape off/snip off the neutral wires of the original duplex receptacle so that there is no bare wire to cause a short. The ground wire stays connected to ground. Be sure you use a 240V type outlet that is incompatible with your regular 115 V plugs.
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A person that does not even know who does that work is not qualified to do it.

Or they have a large AC, or they want to use a welder, or the want to put in a dryer or electric range. All common US appliances.
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On Fri, 01 Jul 2005 10:21:30 GMT, in alt.home.repair RE: Re:
wrote:

Good advice.
--
To reply to me directly, remove the CLUTTER from my email address.


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PaPaPeng wrote:

I have a feeling that anyone who does not know who to call is not going to be qualified to DIY even with a book.

If that is true, they may also have an issue with 50 vs 60 cycle.
....
--
Joseph Meehan

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Ya gotta start somewhere gents. In fact I've learned to do many DIY things, and have even gone on to do them professionally. However, since I'm having this addition built by a builder, I won't bother to learn more than I need to know to make sure the job is done right.
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jeffc wrote:

Jeff, this was in no way intended as a lack of respect for you.
It was intended to indicate that "All you need to do is.." may not be sufficient instructions for someone who may not understand enough to fill in the parts that were not listed. Handling electricity and wiring can be dangerous, if not done right. Even if it is done in a way that would logically seem safe, it might not be according to code and if the next person working on it does not know that, they could be injured making an assumption (which of course they should never do).
I do suggest that if you want to take on this job and make any changes to your wiring, that you consider beginning with a good book on wiring. Even if we were to give you step by step instructions for a normal situation, there is always that chance that you are up against something not according to code (see paragraph above) and that could get you killed. The full book better covers those things and other unexpected things that you don't see yet.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Yep, I think there needs to be sufficient respect shown to the job itself. Im an electrical engineer, and I just did lots of wiring on my mothers house. 120V aint too bad. Overall the danger in installing 120V and 240V is equal. Bad install means hazard for the person living at the residence.
But to the installer 240V means much more danger to himself. Being able to issue a few expletives is a luxury of still being alive...
As an EE I know how electricity works, but that does not mean I know anything about the safety standards electricians have developed over the years. I even read the DIY book in the store. Looks so simple.
But I have a wife and son, and I refuse to touch 240V. Fear is good.
As for assumptions. I recall one day turning off the circuit breaker in the breaker box, then proceeding to install a new outlet/switch at my mothers other house. I got a nasty shock. My mom laughed and said something about my father's wiring the house. Even professionals can make mistakes.
--
Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
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CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert wrote:

I agree with what you wrote. I will add one time I was replacing a hall light. I turned the light on and when down to the basement to unscrew the fuse I thought was it. No luck, on the second try I came back up and the light was out so I went to work. After loosening everything I was pulling the fixture down when I was suddenly showered in sparks. As it turns out the lamp had burned out while I was loosening that second fuse. It was yet another circuit. Needless to say, I was lucky and pulled both mains (it was a duplex with two entries) before continuing.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Not directed at you as you already know, but I would not recommend doing any work on wires unless you have a multimeter to test the actual circuit with. You should first, of course, ensure that the multimeter is working correctly and you're using it correctly.
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That is of course what I'd do, but I'll be hiring someone to do this one :-)
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And only that, this advice is pretty bad:

Yea, but now you might have just opened up the neutral on the downstream line. I say "might", because maybe it had a pigtail (in which case there might not even be neutral "wires" as you write, but only a single neutral wire pigtail, to cut).
And here is another interesting point that I have never thought about:

So does a 240V foreign-made plug have polarity, like modern US 120V plugs? You seem to suggest that it does, by calling one of the screws the "neutral screw". So, you just told the OP to put hot 120V on sometihing that is meant to be neutral. Way to go.
And the kicker:

As pointed out, the OP doesn't even know who to call. Why would you presume anything like this?!
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What you are suggesting is, first of all, senseless, since 240V circuits do not have a neutral.
Second, what you are suggesting is dangerous because if you connect these two circuits in the described manner, the circuits will no longer be safe to work on if only one circuit breaker is turned off (if a device is plugged into the 240V outlet and turned on).
i
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Most do. In fact, it is 120v circuits that do not have neutrals. Still, his advice is idiotic.
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Geez, there you go again, wrong as usual - you got it exactly backward.

No more so than your statement above.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Fri, 01 Jul 2005 14:25:28 GMT, Ignoramus9053

I have just such a 240V set up in my kitchen for >20 years now. I do all my own wiring and so do a lot of people I know who are not electricians or engineers. If you don't feel comfortable handling live electrical work then don't. But there are lots of ordinary people who do like to do their own stuff and can do it without injuring or killing themselves. That's why there is a healthy market for DIY books and TV programs. For your info I also put in a lot of sweat equity to build the house I am living in. Never did it before or since. But that was the only way I could afford a house. Its one solidly built house.
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I do electrical work in my house myself, however, what you are suggesting is a bad way to go. Your setup will make it difficult to make "live electrical" into "not live", by tying two circuits together.
i
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