Electrical requirments for new range: 30 amp versus 50

I am in the process of replacing some appliances in the kitchen. The existing kitchen consists of a separate cooktop (220v/30Amp) and wall oven (220v/30Amp). They will be replaced with a standard free standing range in the new kitchen. The appliance outlet where we purchsed the range has advised me that the manfacturer "recommends" a 50amp circuit to supplu the range. They were surprised at the recommendation since they felt that generally a 30 amp was considered standard. I also was under the assumption that the standard connection was 30amp.
I would like to ask opinions from electrical experts reading this NG. What should the proper wiring configuration be according to the code? Please advise me as to circuit breaker size, wire gauge, conduit/no conduit etc and any other information that I might need for this application.
Will the 50 amp oven work over 30amps OK?
Thank you in advance very much for your help
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my 2 cents worth
50 amp breaker is what you need. 30 amp is for water heater or dryer............NOT range.
also purchase a 4 prong plug or the range.
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in Canada it's 40A for the range.
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G wrote: :: I am in the process of replacing some appliances in the kitchen. The :: existing kitchen consists of a separate cooktop (220v/30Amp) and wall :: oven (220v/30Amp). They will be replaced with a standard free :: standing range in the new kitchen. The appliance outlet where we :: purchsed the range has advised me that the manfacturer "recommends" :: a 50amp circuit to supplu the range. They were surprised at the :: recommendation since they felt that generally a 30 amp was :: considered standard. I also was under the assumption that the :: standard connection was 30amp. :: :: I would like to ask opinions from electrical experts reading this NG. :: What should the proper wiring configuration be according to the code? :: Please advise me as to circuit breaker size, wire gauge, conduit/no :: conduit etc and any other information that I might need for this :: application. :: :: Will the 50 amp oven work over 30amps OK? ::
50 amp is standard for a oven/range combo. You wont be able to use the existing 30A feed. You will need to purchase 8/4 copper wire, or 6/4 aluminum. Not knowing where you live, if you're doing the work yourself, you should check with your local authority having jurisdiction(local electrical inspector) to find out what local codes are. You may or may not have to run it in conduit. Where I live, we can run a cable that size on the bottom of the joists in the basement.
In any case, you'll need a 50A breaker, and a 50A range outlet to match up with the cord that should come supplied with the new range. It should be a 4 wire cable.
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G wrote:

I think 40A is typical. You can certainly try it on the existing circuit; you probably won't be able to use the broiler and all 4 burners on 'HI' at the same time -- but that might be OK.
Bob
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I initially dismissed your post as a troll; obviously a 50a oven won't work on a 30a circuit. But in fact, it will (well, at least it might, but not legally). The problem is that you can't use more than a part of it without tripping a breaker. The 50a recommendation is so that you can use it heavily; if you just use one or two burners, or (maybe) just the oven, it might work.
However, since you will probably want to use both the oven and a burner occasionally, trying to get away with it is a bad idea. Besides, it is a bad idea to routinely rely on a breaker to save your house from burning down; they are intended as emergency devices. Even if you don't care, code is there to prevent you from doing it to the next guy to live there.
You will need 50a breaker and #6 copper or #4 aluminium.
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Toller wrote:

Or, of course, a smaller electric range. Mine works fine on 30A, but I wouldn't want to try cooking a turkey in it.
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There are a few drop in ranges that take 30 amps, they are usually used in efficiency kitchens in apartments~6kw rating , 2 burners and oven. I believe you will find most are rated at ~11kw plus which is 47 amps. The oven manufacture and the NEC both figure that you are going to use all of the burners and oven at the same time. Having said that if you want to ignore the code and common practices you could connect the new range to the circuit and when you have your first party, and your wife is cooking away and the breaker shuts down and spoils the party and your wife mood for several weeks. Go ahead.
A friend of mine took the range circuit for his welder intending to run new wiring for the range. They planned Thanksgiving dinner for 40 people, I showed up early to help cook when the range would not work wifey freaked. The screaming that followed put me on the patio. As I gazed on the Weber grill. An idea came to mind. First time I had ever had a smoked turkey..
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G wrote:

Have you checked the existing wire size and breaker?
I think for separate cooktops and ovens they sometimes use a "10 foot tap rule" or something; running two 30A appliances on one 40A or 50A circuit. You may only have to run new #8 or #6 wire from the junction box under the cooktop. I don't really know what I'm talking about here, it's been a long time since I read about kitchen wiring with split oven/cooktops, but it's something you can investigate.
Don't freak out if you find aluminum wiring in the range circuit.
Bob
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Hi 'G',
If I may jump in here with my $.02 too, *most* free-standing range installs are fine on a 50A circuit and #6 cable.
To determine your range's current requirement/size breaker required, look at the model number plate. Divide the kw by the voltage, and the result is the actual total amperage draw with all the loads running. The circuit breaker should be at least this rating.
Hope that helps.
--
God bless,

Dave Harnish
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installs
Why would that be better than simply following the manufacturer's instructions?
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Doubful. The NEC realizes that burners on a range cycle on and off, and that you rarely use all the burners simultaneously. For a range that draws between 8 KW and 12 KW, a 40A circuit is code legal as is an assumed load of 33.3 amps. When the sizes get larger than this, the required circuit size can get confusing. That being said, I would prefer a range circuit to have the ampacity to run the maximum possible load of the range. Typically, this is a 50A circuit on 6-3 copper for a range between 10KW and 12 KW.
In just about every new house I've seen, the range circuit is 40A using 8-3 copper.
-- Mark Kent, WA
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Just to add, I would check the book that came with it or call the manufacture of the stove,instead of relying on the salesman. Most likely he is correct, but you never know, Thanks, Tony D.

that you rarely use all the

40A circuit is code legal

the required circuit size

the ampacity to run the

6-3 copper for a range

8-3 copper.

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