electrical question: can anyone explain this?

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My wife SWEARS that her hair dryer gets hotter when she uses it at other people's houses. I seem to think that our George Forman grill doesn't get as hot as I've seen in others' houses. Is this a perception thing, or is there something with the power in our house that would cause appliaces with heating elements to not get as hot as other places? Is it something with the ol' W = V x A equasion? Could there not be enough Amps to create enough Wattage to properly power these types of devices that require a lot of Wattage?? Help!! Thanks so much to all who respond!!
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possible.
Have you checked your line voltage?
Long runs, undersized wiring, overloaded transformers, a wealth of things can contribuite to this.
check line voltage at different times of day, middle of the nite may see higher voltage.
if you have heard of brownouts? thats basically a lower line voltage
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Oner advantage iot leads to longer light bulb life, although dramatically less briteness:(
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com ( snipped-for-privacy@aol.com) said...

Not only less bright, but also a shift in its colour spectrum. That can lead to things looking a little "redder" than normal.
--
Calvin Henry-Cotnam
"I really think Canada should get over to Iraq as quickly as possible"
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

plugged in to that same outlet (assuming it's not separated or switched) turning the dryer on and off. I do electrical repairs for people and carry a hair dryer for circuit load testing and finding breakers. I have seen many wire gauge problems the one that comes quickly to mind is the apartment building that was owned by a friend of mine. Looking into this exact kind of problem I found that the building had been rewired with #16 or smaller. I don't even know anyone who will sell you that as a electrical contractor. I don't know how it got past the inspectors in the first place or how it got past them the 2nd time when my friend sold the building. It could also be bad junctions. Richard
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spudnuty wrote:

To be sure, measuring voltage with dryer plugged in and running vs. without to see if there is too much vltage drop. Or use an Amprobe to see current draw. Good thing your friend's apartment did not start electrical fire!
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Back when I was a handyman, I got a call from a guy who had a brownout. He called late in the evening and I was done for the day. But he agreed to pay the extra cost of an emergency call. He's very lucky he agreed to that. The entire house was wired with 18-2 lamp cord tacked to the baseboard with those cheap baseboard outlets they sold back in those days (this was in the late 70's). When I arrived I noticed a burnt smell when I walked in the door. When I placed my hand over the one outlet where all the wires originated, the wall was very hot. I immediately shut off the power and told the guy to call the fire dept. He refused to call. (The guy was a drunk). As soon as he refused, I just said "then I got to do this), and I started busting open the wall. There was no flame (yet), but the wires were charring wood. I ended up ripping open the whole wall, and dumping a few buckets of water down from the second floor to the basement. Another 10 minutes that place would have been in flames.
This is a long story, but the guy refused to have the place wired correctly, so he just paid me to run one outlet into the kitchen, hook it to the old fuse box (where I changed the fuses to 15A instead of the 30A ones that was there) This box had 2 fuses, one for the lower apt, one for the upper apt, and this guy lived in the upper). After I got that one outlet installed, he told me to just hook all those 18-2 wires to that outlet again. I refused, and told him that if he wanted to do it himself, he could put a plug on the end and plug them in, but I was not going to wire them to the screws on the outlet like they were when I got there. He was pissed, but I told him it's against the law and I can not do it. He paid me, said he'd get someone else to hook it up, and also to clean up and repair all the busted walls.
I should also note that the refrigerator was being run on that 18-2 and I offerred to help him move it to where the new outlet was installed, but he said it dont belong there and went and got another 18-2 lamp cord to plug it in.....
I tried to explain he was living in danger, but he did not care. I just took the check and said "Whatever"....
Mark
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maybe neighbor's room is warmer and her hairdryer adds to that higher starting temperature. i looked at those grills a couple years ago and found george foreman makes a variety of similar grills, check the model numbers and wattages on the device plate; also check starting temperature of the product from the neighbor's warmer freezer.
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check voltage at socket. Turn hair dryer on. Check voltage again. See if the run voltage is much lower than no load. Four or five volts is expected.
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Thanks everyone. I tested the voltage with and without load. Started at 119.6v and was 112.3v with the hair dryer on. I'll have to do the same test at someone elses house to see if there's a difference. Thanks again.
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jlatenight wrote:

You should compare it to the load applied across the hot and the neutral at the same receptacle as you compared the load accross the hot and the ground.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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jlatenight wrote:

That drop sounds excessive to me. Where did you make the measurement? At the same outlet? A hair dryer should not change the voltage by more than a tenth of a volt or so.
How about at different outlets?
A measurement at the circuit breaker would be also in order to see if the drop is external to the house. A measurement on a different circuit with nothing turned on would also accomplish this. You could turn on the dryer and go around measuring at various outlets to see if any or all drop.
If you have aluminum wire it could be a poor connection in either the hot or return wires. That includes at the return buss in the breaker box.
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That's a bit excessive, agreed. But, a 12A hair dryer on the end of a longish 14ga 15A circuit could easily pull down a circuit by a couple volts.
200' of 14ga is about .2 ohms. At 12A, that's 2.4V.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Chris Lewis wrote:

But 7.3 volts (36A)? And are hair dryers over 1400 Watts? I really don't know.
I recall that once I noted that when an appliance turned on some lights would dim and others would get bright. I found that at times some lines were 110 and others were 130. Also true at the breaker box. Called the power company (quite surprised when their truck drove up in front of the house about 5 minutes later - just happened to be close by). They found that there was a burned return line in a main junction box - it was a big aluminum wire that they still use for main lines. I was probably using the ground rod at the meter for a return.
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jlatenight wrote:

Highly doubtful. Perhaps you don't have a humidifier in your home? Or moreover, the air conditions are different between the homes creating a perception of performance.
My GF grill has a light and a dial on it. Thus its temperature is monitored/adjustable to some degree. So its not 100% pegged to line voltage.
--
Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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Defective Electricity. Definately defective. Complain to your electric company and tell them you are not going to pay your electric bill until they correct it. It's probably recycled power you are getting. It's already been used once and you are just getting the left over, used power.
However, before you complain too loudly, be sure your wiring is not worn out. It could be old wiring where the copper has simply run out of electrons. You could even have some clogs in the wires. Get a can of "Wireno" (wire drano), and thoroughly flush out your wires.
And the last possibility are the houses where they wanted to save money, so they used the HOT water pipes for the HOT LINE VOLTAGE, used the COLD water pipes for the NEUTRAL, and used the GAS pipes for the GROUND. You could have a bad dielectric union, so all the power is leaking into the hot water heater and is heating water instead of going to the outlets. If your water is too hot, this is an indicator of this condition. Also note if the gas coming out of the burners in your stove is hot before it is ignited, you have an electrical leak to ground.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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On a SERIOUS NOTE he could have alunimum wiring:(
It was used years ago to cut costs. trouble is its higher resistance and can become a fire hazard. its trouble can lead to low voltage and this situation should be investigated.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

aluminum larger wire is used. Connections to aluminum wire are what fail.
bud--
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

ROTFLMAO!!!
Next time, consider also including my favorite, the "loose disconnection".
That's what we used to tell our non-tech savvy customers when the real cause of the problem we fixed would have taken too long to explain and they wouldn't have understood a word of it anyway.
Jeff
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