Electrical Q: moving microwave outlet above the range

SWMBO has decided an above-the-range microwave is to replace existing range hood.
The hood circuit powers other equipment and cannot be used for the microwave. This is a code restriction, not a practical one. The only option is to "move" the existing microwave outlet to the cabinet above the stove, probably 6' away from existing location.
Local codes aside, it it generally acceptable to use armored cable or some other form of mechanical protection to extend the circuit (outside the wall) to the new location? Aesthetically it's not a problem. Fishing wire through walls isn't a good option as cabinets, firewalls and exterior walls are in the way...not worth it for a microwave relocation.
Then there's the extension cord method....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/23/2012 10:41 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

This is a code restriction, not a practical one. The only option is to "move" the existing microwave outlet to the cabinet above the stove, probably 6' away from existing location.

other form of mechanical protection to extend the circuit (outside the wall) to the new location? Aesthetically it's not a problem. Fishing wire through walls isn't a good option as cabinets, firewalls and exterior walls are in the way...not worth it for a microwave relocation.

Assume you've looked into using the existing range hood wire and reconfiguring the other equipment power for code compliance?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SWMBO has decided an above-the-range microwave is to replace existing range hood.
The hood circuit powers other equipment and cannot be used for the microwave. This is a code restriction, not a practical one. The only option is to "move" the existing microwave outlet to the cabinet above the stove, probably 6' away from existing location.
Local codes aside, it it generally acceptable to use armored cable or some other form of mechanical protection to extend the circuit (outside the wall) to the new location? Aesthetically it's not a problem. Fishing wire through walls isn't a good option as cabinets, firewalls and exterior walls are in the way...not worth it for a microwave relocation.
Then there's the extension cord method....
Wiremold is an external raceway product and generally approved for such applications as you describe. You can usually use either the plastic or the metal types. Big box stores carry a limited stock of raceway lengths, surface boxes, connectors and other parts; but you can find all of the parts you need on line through electrical distributors.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Dec 2012 10:41:18 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

This is a code restriction, not a practical one. The only option is to "move" the existing microwave outlet to the cabinet above the stove, probably 6' away from existing location.
What code restriction? How big is the circuit and what is the rating of the microwave?
210.23(A)((2) Utilization Equipment Fastened in Place. The total rating of utilization equipment fastened in place, other than luminaires, shall not exceed 50 percent of the branch-circuit ampere rating where lighting units, cord-and-plug-connected utilization equipment not fastened in place, or both, are also supplied.
If this is a 15a circuit you can put a 900w microwave up there and if it is 20a you can use a 1200w unit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, December 23, 2012 6:29:00 PM UTC-3:30, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:


Most OTR microwaves are 1000W+. It's a 15A circuit that also includes 6 lights and 5 outlets (the outlets don't carry much load, which is why I said no "practical" restriction). I believe the new micro is 1000W.
Wiremold would actually work pretty well, easily "hidden" at the top of the cabinets. Same comment for armored cable, but wouldn't be quite as clean. The microwave isn't a counter-top model, it sits (poorly) in a little cubby built into the cabinets.
And then option #3 presented itself. There is a spare circuit in the panel and by some miracle there is also an easy path to make the run. I disconnected/abandoned the hood cabling via a nearby light, good to go.
As for no spare circuits left in the panel (after this change), I could always abandon the old microwave outlet...but I can't say I fully understand that requirement.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've had two OTR microwaves, both were under 1kw output power. I never looked at input power. My little big inverter microwave is near 1200 watts. I have that mounted on a wall shelf, and my OTR 800 watt output microwave / 900 watts turbo oven. I have a dedicated outlet for the 800 watt OTR, but NOT with the little/big panasonic. Anyway, check input power requirements, not output.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The 800w unit will not require a dedicated circuit at all and the 1200w will not need a dedicated circuit if it is on a 20a.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Dec 2012 10:41:18 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

This is a code restriction, not a practical one. The only option is to "move" the existing microwave outlet to the cabinet above the stove, probably 6' away from existing location.

other form of mechanical protection to extend the circuit (outside the wall) to the new location? Aesthetically it's not a problem. Fishing wire through walls isn't a good option as cabinets, firewalls and exterior walls are in the way...not worth it for a microwave relocation.

They make very pretty blue and green cup hooks that can screw to the ceiling and hold your extension cord.
Or you can use wiremold.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

This is a code restriction, not a practical one. The only option is to "move" the existing microwave outlet to the cabinet above the stove, probably 6' away from existing location.

other form of mechanical protection to extend the circuit (outside the wall) to the new location? Aesthetically it's not a problem. Fishing wire through walls isn't a good option as cabinets, firewalls and exterior walls are in the way...not worth it for a microwave relocation.

If the circuits are both on the same countertop, go down and run armored cable under the countertop and go up the wall cavity behind the stove. For what its worth, I have in 28 years as an inspector seen MANY convert to a venthood and relocate mw. One dropped dish filled with scalding liquid is enough for most people...
--
Mr.E

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is a code restriction, not a practical one. The only option is to "move" the existing microwave outlet to the cabinet above the stove, probably 6' away from existing location.

other form of mechanical protection to extend the circuit (outside the wall) to the new location? Aesthetically it's not a problem. Fishing wire through walls isn't a good option as cabinets, firewalls and exterior walls are in the way...not worth it for a microwave relocation.

OTOH, SWMBO would never again have a countertop microwave. It takes no (usable) space in the hood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
there are those long drill bits made just for drilling thru 2 by 4 fireblocking etc. i wouldnt run it on the outside of the wall even with wiremold it looks junky....
i have used those longs bits even with extensions they work great. except for one place here where a steel beam must be buried in the wall between floors.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

For the record, they are long *flexible* bits. They even have them now at Home Depot, in 3 and 6 foot lengths. (and maybe others, especially at a phone or burglar alarm supply store) I forget if 3 feet is enough for this one, but if you want to run wiring from an unfinished attic down a wall, or from a basement up, , 6 foot is better, and not that much more.
They cojme in more than one diameter and more than one kind of tip. Probably most economical to buy a big one.

I agree. I just accepted the OP's judgment.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

they also have a hole in the end of the auger type bit to connect your new wire too......
very convenient
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Called an "installer bit"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.