Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?

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Like this
http://www.legrand.us/~/media/products/images/pass-and-seymour/2011/nov%202011/415-w.ashx?bc=White&as=1&dmc=0&h 1&w1
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In wrote:

Wow, interesting! Yes, like that! -- except maybe a duplex receptacle instead of a "quad".
I found this info on the one you posted:
SPECIFICATION GRADE QUAD RECEPTACLE, 415W , Pass & Seymour
http://www.legrand.us/passandseymour/receptacles/power-strips-quads/quads/quads/415w.aspx
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I have also seen a duplex with them going up and down (ground on both ends) There is a quad out there with them in all 4 orientations too.
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In

I have never seen one, but I would like to find one so I could check it out and see how they are constructed etc.

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TomR posted for all of us...

Let us NOT go through this again, especially as this was brought up just last week. DAGS
--
Tekkie

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On 09/30/2016 03:14 PM, Tekkie® wrote:

Yah, so much drama. After the inspection, switch them to any position you like.
I guarantee it's faster to reorient the receptacles than to fight a bunch of brainless bureaucrats at city hall.
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Uncle Monster submitted this idea :

http://www.kordking.com/products/power-cords/offset-right-angle.php
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Derby Day wrote:
I haven't. My hedge trimmer doesn't have it's own cord, just a plug built into a recessed area of the handle. The socket end of an extension cord connects directly to that plug and is held in by a molded hook.
Now ask me about cutting the *extension cord* with my hedge trimmer
I have the same type of trimmer, and several various length extension cords to use depending on how far from the house I have to go. I just checked, at least one of my 5 extension cords does not have a band of tape where I n icked/cut it. Of course, that is over 40+ years of use so I guess it is no t too bad.
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On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 12:13:49 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:



ds to use depending on how far from the house I have to go. I just checked , at least one of my 5 extension cords does not have a band of tape where I nicked/cut it. Of course, that is over 40+ years of use so I guess it is not too bad.
Several of my extension cords are not as long as when I bought them.
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On Monday, October 3, 2016 at 3:19:26 PM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

lt


ords to use depending on how far from the house I have to go. I just check ed, at least one of my 5 extension cords does not have a band of tape where I nicked/cut it. Of course, that is over 40+ years of use so I guess it i s not too bad.

Many years ago my (then) teenage son got hired by a well-to-do family friend to help him clean out his garage. When I went to pick him I saw a 50' 12g extension cord - on a reel - on top of the trash pile. It looked almost brand new, so I grabbed it and tossed it in the car.
When I got home I found that the cord had been cut about 6' from one end. It was held together just by a piece of the outer jacket.
I bought a plug and socket and turned it into a 6' cord and a 44' cord. It's 15 years later and I still use both of them. I remember explaining to my son what happens when you have more money than you know what to do with.
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Ed Pawlowski
8:26 PM (1 hour ago)
On 10/3/2016 9:27 AM, TimR wrote:

ite

the

and

Define cut. Clear through? Nope, never did that. Lets not get into details such as cutting through the insulation and other meaningless trivial facts.
You don't have to cut clean thru to have a problem, just severing one of th e two/three conductors will stop things pretty effectively. I have been k nown to repair that type of failure by inserting a bare copper wire a coupl e of inches long into the two cut ends to reestablish conductivity for that conductor, and then taping over the whole thing. That works fine as long as the insulation over the unsevered conductor(s) is/are intact, and the co rd is not flexed too much.
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On Wednesday, September 28, 2016 at 9:18:14 PM UTC-4, TomR wrote:

homes in florida often have outlets in the same home orientated both ways
ground pin down for always on, ground pin up for switched outlets
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In typed:

I wonder why that would be the criteria for ground pin up vs. down.
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It is just done as a way to identify switched outlets. On a "half hot" the bottom one is switched.
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In typed:

Interesting. Good to know. I like to do the "half hot" switched outlet routine once in a while, so it's good to know that the bottom one is typically the switch-controlled half.
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I have two switched outlets. One has ground pin down with the switch on top. Left is off, right is on.
The other is horizontal. The switch is on the left, outlet on the right so ground pin is to the right. Down is off, up is on.
The outlet for my washing machine was installed when my house was renovated 15 years ago. The ground pin was up, but the power cord plugged in "upside down". I eventually got tired of looking at the cord folding over and rotated the outlet.
All of the other outlets were installed with the ground pin down. This includes the separately switched garbage disposal outlet under the sink.
Fred in Florida
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Every 120V major appliance (refrigerator, air conditioner, etc) I've seen has had a plug designed for the ground pin on the bottom. Counter-top kitchen appliances with grounds (like microwave ovens) usually have a straight plug.
To me, the whole ground on top thing smacks of safety theater. Exposed prongs are a safety hazard no matter what the plug's orientation. Putting the ground on top just makes is slightly harder to insert a plug into the outlet.
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On 10/05/2016 03:27 PM, Neill Massello wrote:
[snip]

Why would it be harder? Either way, you have to orient the plug in a certain way.
I suspect it's just the "the way it is is best" fallacy.
--
80 days until the winter celebration (Sunday December 25, 2016 12:00:00
AM for 1 day).
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bob haller:
Understand the reasoning behind it, but I think it would make sense the other way round:
Always on: Ground pin up Switched: pin down.
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On 10/05/2016 02:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Is there some reason for that, other than it would mean most of the receptacles would be ground-up.
Also, how would you install a duplex receptacle where only one side is switched?
--
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