Electrical Outlets Upside Down? Code?

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on 9/29/2016, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo supposed :

We have a staircase and hallway with switches which would keep you busy for a long long time.
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TomR explained on 9/28/2016 :

No, but some installations such as hospitals might dictate the ground up preference. Some equipment designed for hospitals and such might have cords with right-angle plugs on the end which expect the ground-up orientation. As someone else has mentioned, there may be locals codes to consider where NEC is agnostic on the matter.
You are probably right, your friend is probably wrong, and his enforcement official should be able to cite an official local code to remove the 'probably' from those statements. If he does cite a source, I would like to see it because no such source has ever been cited before as far as I know.
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On Thursday, September 29, 2016 at 6:45:29 AM UTC-4, FromTheRafters wrote:

I've got a couple of appliance cords that expect the ground pin to be up. The freezer in my garage is like that, so I spun the receptacle around to match.
I replaced the cord on a really old, almost jet engine strength, floor fan many years ago. I don't recall where I got the cord from, but the plug is designed for ground pin up.
OT, but here's a plug-socket habit/pet peeve of mine:
When plugging a "permanent" item (lamp, clock radio, toaster oven, etc.) into a duplex receptacle, please use the bottom receptacle to keep the top receptacle open for temporary use.
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On 09/29/2016 08:38 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
[snip]

That's something I do. Sometimes, I've even changed it in public places.
Unlike a lot of people, my idea of "looks best" depends on practical things, not silly rules. If you plug something into the top outlet (of a vertically mounted) duplex receptacle, the cord hangs down across the bottom outlet making it harder to use.
I'm not sure if I EVER thought it looked best to use the top.
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Just wrap electrical tape around the hot terminal on all plugs!
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And every *consumer* right-angle or wall-hugging plug I've ever seen was designed for the ground pin on the bottom.
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On Thu, 29 Sep 2016 17:25:28 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Neill Massello) wrote:

Lots of them are the other way. It seems to depend on whether they think the appliance will mound above the plug.
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In wrote:

I agree. I see them both ways.
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On 09/29/2016 06:25 PM, Neill Massello wrote:
[snip]

I have several of those adapters (converts duplex grounded outlet to 6), with the outlets on the sides. There seems to be nothing about them that would be better with one orientation (ground down or ground up) than the other.
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You're partially correct. The ground pin is not known as a neutral pin. The flat blade that's currently made wider than the other flat blade is the neutral. While both of them are grounded, the neutral is intended to carry current, and the ground only carries current in the event of a fault. It is safer to have the ground on top for the reason you mentioned, but I know of nothing in the NEC that dictates which way you mount them, unless it's a recent change.
This was one of my main complaints with electrical inspectors, back when I had to deal with them. Sometimes they make shit up and claim it's a code violation, when it isn't. We had an old saying: "Those who can, do. Those who can't, inspect".
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On Thu, 29 Sep 2016 09:17:18 -0700, Checkmate, DoW #1 wrote:

Expect Fakey along any hour now to embarrass himself by proving his fathomless ignorance of all things electrical engineering. Again.
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Mr. Safety says use a recessed receptacle:
https://www.amazon.com/Leviton-689-W-Recessed-Receptacle-Residential/dp/B0012DKBL2
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On Saturday, October 1, 2016 at 8:00:07 AM UTC-5, Mr. Safety wrote:

Good choice Mr. Safety, but often there isn't enough room in the box to use it!
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On 10/01/2016 01:32 PM, bob_villa wrote:

When it comes to electrical safety, there are no 'short' cuts.
Demo the wall and put in a bigger box. While you're at it, put in a new entrance panel with AFCIs. It's for the kids!
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Another option, albeit not real attractive, is to use a weatherproof outlet cover:
https://www.amazon.com/MM410C-Weatherproof-Outdoor-Receptacle- Protector/dp/B001JEPX44/ref=sr_1_1
Plug the cord in, close the cover, and nothing it going to fall between the plug and the outlet, not even rain.
I suppose you could paint the cover to match the wall. Perfect for those situations where you're constantly dropping pieces of metal on your electrical outlets. :)
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On 10/01/2016 10:53 AM, HerHusband wrote:
[snip]

The broken link led to a nice picture of a dog.
The receptacle cover should keep metal objects from falling in. At least until someone gets tired of dealing with it and removes it.
[snip]
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Mr. Safety explained :

Prevents 'wall warts' too.
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DerbyDad03 has brought this to us :

Yeah, I looked it up to see what the correct terminology was just after hitting send. I saw that the description used the words 'insulator' and 'standoff' so I figured no harm, no foul.

He never does, and he is very often wrong.

:)
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In typed:

Thanks all for the replies. Looks like the answer is that there is no national code (in the U.S.A.) that requires outlets to be oriented in any special direction.
One thing that I also noticed in recent years is that there does not seem to be any one standard way that the 3 prongs on 3-prong plugs are oriented -- including the flush mount type plugs that allow the wire to be parallel to the wall with the plug plugged in. With those types of plugs, I would like to be able to orient the outlet so that the plug wire can come up from the floor or down from the appliance (such as a window A/C) and plug in correctly. I am probably not describing or explaining this too well.
And, I sometimes thought it would be interesting if all outlets were designed so that there would be not "up" or "down" position. For example, if all duplex outlets had the ground pin of each outlet on each end and the other two prongs in the center, then there would be no "up" or "down" orientation -- the outlet would look the same regardless of which way it was installed. But, there would be problems with that idea because that would result it the hot side screw of one outlet being on the same side as the neutral side screw of the other outlet in the duplex.
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On Thursday, September 29, 2016 at 3:07:16 PM UTC-4, TomR wrote:

There is no up or down position now.

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