Electrical outlets near doorways.

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Doug Miller wrote:

Yep and the 6ft rule is way over what should be required. When I did my 18x30 addition I figured that was enough and spaced them every 6 or 8 ft (don't recall now) with the first at each side of any door - it wasn't enough.
Going strictly by the 6ft rule it is possible to have just one outlet on a 12ft wall.
Harry K
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No, it's not -- unless there's a doorway at each end of it. The Code specifically states "including space measured around corners".
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Yes it is. My addition is 18x30 with entrance in the middle of the 30'. Thus I could put one outlet 6' from that door and another down in the corner...well yes, you are right, I would have 2 in 15 ft. But it isn't hard to come up with a floor plan that would allow it, for example just shifting my entrance over a bit.
Harry K
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24" in the US, 36" in Canada ... guess we have longer arms ... or something ... up here.
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What is the 36'' rule ? Does it apply to USA ? I know the 6ft rule. I thought an outlet had to be located no more than 3 feet from either side of a door ? Or not ? bowgus wrote:

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There is no placement rule for outlets that specifically mentions doors. Although I think there is one for light switches along the primary entry/exit path.
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Yes, there is. NEC 210.52(A)(1) defines required outlet placement within a "wall space", and 210.52(A)(2)(1) explicitly states that "wall spaces" are delimited by doorways and other similar openings.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Also, according to Knight (and the CEC) you also count the space occupied by the door itself when fully open as part of the doorway.
So you can put an outlet 6' from the edge of the door (nearly 9' from the doorway proper and still be code compliant.
Chris
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That does not appear to be the case with the U.S. NEC, however.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 01:33:46 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Except that it is possible to construct an area where there IS no wall space within several feet of the door. Take for example, the badly designed rear entryway shown at www.goedjn.com/sketch/noplug.gif
As long as the wall segments marked with red dots are less than 24" long, there is noplace in the entryway where you are required to have a convenience outlet.
--Goedjn
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Not specifically, in the NEC. The only spacing requirement is that, for any point at the base of any wall more than 23" wide, there must be an outlet within 6' that you can get to without crossing a doorway.
That ends UP meaning that there has to be an outlet within 6 feet of the door, unless there are other doors breaking up the wall. You could easily, for instance, design a mudroom/entry with three doors, a closet, and a stairway leading off in various directions such that there's no place you're required to have an outlet.
But you ought to have one anyway. Put it in the same box as a light switch if you have to.
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It is worth remembering that the point of these NEC requirements is to discourage the use of extension cords.
Just a few decades ago, many extension cords were of the cheap, crummy "zip cord" type, thin 18 g. wires, thin insulation with plastic multi-outlet receptacles on the end. The were easily overloaded and started many fires even though they carried the UL seal of approval.
Also... In addition to overloads, these cords were easily damaged by kids, chewed on by pets, smashed by furniture, and tread on by being placed under carpets.
For those of you who are old enough to notice, you can't buy these cheap extension cords new anymore. New extension cords are all of a miniumum thickness and conductor size. Still, it is desirable not to have to use an extension cord, if possible, and avoid having to use one in a permanent situation at all costs.
If you have a new home, the reason your kitchen counter is full of electrical outlets is that the authorities absolutely don't want you using an extension cord to plug in a deep fryer or your George Foreman electric grill. Notice also that these days, all of these appliances come with short cords (about 2 feet or so) which are intended to be used with this bountiful multiplicity of kitchen outlets.
Beachcomber
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Beachcomber wrote:

BC:
Well, the wires may be bigger, but inexpensive extension cords are still made from zip cord, which can still be pet-chewed and door- smashed. Any flexible cord trailing across a floor or under a carpet, whether zip cord or SO cable, is more in harm's way than permanent wiring would be (though you'd have to work fairly hard on the SO cable (: ) so I guess the objection still stands. Anyway a big mess of extension cords looks like heck.
Cordially yours: G P
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I have one like that. It's often in exactly the right place for an outlet.
--
27 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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Remember the NEC is about SAFETY.
Convenience is another matter altogether
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